Poor correlation of mouth-to-mouth ventilation skills after basic life support training and 6 months later

Volker Wenzel, Peter Lehmkuhl, Paul S. Kubilis, Ahamed H. Idris, Ina Pichlmayr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) skills of medical students after a 2-h basic life support class (n = 129) and 6 months later (n = 113). Mean ± SD written test score decreased from 6.4 ± 0.7 to 6.2 ± 0.8 (P = 0.03). Mean ± SD breaths delivered before CPR decreased from 2.9 ± 0.6 to 2.2 ± 1.2 (P = 0.0001), ventilation rate increased from 12.2 ± 1.9 to 14.3 ± 5.0 breaths/min (P = 0.0001), tidal volume increased from 0.75 ± 0.2 to 0.8 ± 0.31 (P = 0.11), minute ventilation from 9.1 ± 2.6 to 10.8 ± 3.6 1 (P = 0.0001), and stomach inflation from 13 ± 22 to 18 ± 27% of CPR breaths (P = 0.11). Mean ± SD chest compressions/min decreased from 56 ± 9 to 54 ± 12 (P = 0.34), depth of chest compressions increased from 41 ± 6 to 46 ± 7 mm (P = 0.0001), hands-held incorrectly on the thorax increased from 22 ± 27 to 23 ± 32% (P = 0.59), and leaning on the chest from 4 ± 12 to 18 ± 28% of compressions (P < 0.0001). In summary, ventilation skills were unpredictable; there was only a 5% chance that a given student would achieve the same mouth-to-mouth ventilation performance in both the BLS class and 6 months later. Despite the respiratory mechanics of the CPR manikin which prevented stomach inflation much better than an unconscious patient with an unprotected airway, stomach inflation occurred repeatedly. Teachers of basic life support classes need to consider the respiratory mechanics of the CPR manikin being used to assure clinically realistic and appropriate mouth-to-mouth ventilation skills.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)129-134
Number of pages6
JournalResuscitation
Volume35
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1997

Fingerprint

Training Support
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Ventilation
Mouth
Economic Inflation
Thorax
Respiratory Mechanics
Manikins
Stomach
Tidal Volume
Medical Students
Hand
Students

Keywords

  • Artificial respiration
  • Basic life support
  • Cardiac arrest
  • Manikin
  • Resuscitation
  • Retention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Poor correlation of mouth-to-mouth ventilation skills after basic life support training and 6 months later. / Wenzel, Volker; Lehmkuhl, Peter; Kubilis, Paul S.; Idris, Ahamed H.; Pichlmayr, Ina.

In: Resuscitation, Vol. 35, No. 2, 10.1997, p. 129-134.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wenzel, Volker ; Lehmkuhl, Peter ; Kubilis, Paul S. ; Idris, Ahamed H. ; Pichlmayr, Ina. / Poor correlation of mouth-to-mouth ventilation skills after basic life support training and 6 months later. In: Resuscitation. 1997 ; Vol. 35, No. 2. pp. 129-134.
@article{0a5e65563fc6464d8b3fd4cbdc9632e9,
title = "Poor correlation of mouth-to-mouth ventilation skills after basic life support training and 6 months later",
abstract = "The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) skills of medical students after a 2-h basic life support class (n = 129) and 6 months later (n = 113). Mean ± SD written test score decreased from 6.4 ± 0.7 to 6.2 ± 0.8 (P = 0.03). Mean ± SD breaths delivered before CPR decreased from 2.9 ± 0.6 to 2.2 ± 1.2 (P = 0.0001), ventilation rate increased from 12.2 ± 1.9 to 14.3 ± 5.0 breaths/min (P = 0.0001), tidal volume increased from 0.75 ± 0.2 to 0.8 ± 0.31 (P = 0.11), minute ventilation from 9.1 ± 2.6 to 10.8 ± 3.6 1 (P = 0.0001), and stomach inflation from 13 ± 22 to 18 ± 27{\%} of CPR breaths (P = 0.11). Mean ± SD chest compressions/min decreased from 56 ± 9 to 54 ± 12 (P = 0.34), depth of chest compressions increased from 41 ± 6 to 46 ± 7 mm (P = 0.0001), hands-held incorrectly on the thorax increased from 22 ± 27 to 23 ± 32{\%} (P = 0.59), and leaning on the chest from 4 ± 12 to 18 ± 28{\%} of compressions (P < 0.0001). In summary, ventilation skills were unpredictable; there was only a 5{\%} chance that a given student would achieve the same mouth-to-mouth ventilation performance in both the BLS class and 6 months later. Despite the respiratory mechanics of the CPR manikin which prevented stomach inflation much better than an unconscious patient with an unprotected airway, stomach inflation occurred repeatedly. Teachers of basic life support classes need to consider the respiratory mechanics of the CPR manikin being used to assure clinically realistic and appropriate mouth-to-mouth ventilation skills.",
keywords = "Artificial respiration, Basic life support, Cardiac arrest, Manikin, Resuscitation, Retention",
author = "Volker Wenzel and Peter Lehmkuhl and Kubilis, {Paul S.} and Idris, {Ahamed H.} and Ina Pichlmayr",
year = "1997",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1016/S0300-9572(97)00044-0",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "35",
pages = "129--134",
journal = "Resuscitation",
issn = "0300-9572",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Poor correlation of mouth-to-mouth ventilation skills after basic life support training and 6 months later

AU - Wenzel, Volker

AU - Lehmkuhl, Peter

AU - Kubilis, Paul S.

AU - Idris, Ahamed H.

AU - Pichlmayr, Ina

PY - 1997/10

Y1 - 1997/10

N2 - The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) skills of medical students after a 2-h basic life support class (n = 129) and 6 months later (n = 113). Mean ± SD written test score decreased from 6.4 ± 0.7 to 6.2 ± 0.8 (P = 0.03). Mean ± SD breaths delivered before CPR decreased from 2.9 ± 0.6 to 2.2 ± 1.2 (P = 0.0001), ventilation rate increased from 12.2 ± 1.9 to 14.3 ± 5.0 breaths/min (P = 0.0001), tidal volume increased from 0.75 ± 0.2 to 0.8 ± 0.31 (P = 0.11), minute ventilation from 9.1 ± 2.6 to 10.8 ± 3.6 1 (P = 0.0001), and stomach inflation from 13 ± 22 to 18 ± 27% of CPR breaths (P = 0.11). Mean ± SD chest compressions/min decreased from 56 ± 9 to 54 ± 12 (P = 0.34), depth of chest compressions increased from 41 ± 6 to 46 ± 7 mm (P = 0.0001), hands-held incorrectly on the thorax increased from 22 ± 27 to 23 ± 32% (P = 0.59), and leaning on the chest from 4 ± 12 to 18 ± 28% of compressions (P < 0.0001). In summary, ventilation skills were unpredictable; there was only a 5% chance that a given student would achieve the same mouth-to-mouth ventilation performance in both the BLS class and 6 months later. Despite the respiratory mechanics of the CPR manikin which prevented stomach inflation much better than an unconscious patient with an unprotected airway, stomach inflation occurred repeatedly. Teachers of basic life support classes need to consider the respiratory mechanics of the CPR manikin being used to assure clinically realistic and appropriate mouth-to-mouth ventilation skills.

AB - The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) skills of medical students after a 2-h basic life support class (n = 129) and 6 months later (n = 113). Mean ± SD written test score decreased from 6.4 ± 0.7 to 6.2 ± 0.8 (P = 0.03). Mean ± SD breaths delivered before CPR decreased from 2.9 ± 0.6 to 2.2 ± 1.2 (P = 0.0001), ventilation rate increased from 12.2 ± 1.9 to 14.3 ± 5.0 breaths/min (P = 0.0001), tidal volume increased from 0.75 ± 0.2 to 0.8 ± 0.31 (P = 0.11), minute ventilation from 9.1 ± 2.6 to 10.8 ± 3.6 1 (P = 0.0001), and stomach inflation from 13 ± 22 to 18 ± 27% of CPR breaths (P = 0.11). Mean ± SD chest compressions/min decreased from 56 ± 9 to 54 ± 12 (P = 0.34), depth of chest compressions increased from 41 ± 6 to 46 ± 7 mm (P = 0.0001), hands-held incorrectly on the thorax increased from 22 ± 27 to 23 ± 32% (P = 0.59), and leaning on the chest from 4 ± 12 to 18 ± 28% of compressions (P < 0.0001). In summary, ventilation skills were unpredictable; there was only a 5% chance that a given student would achieve the same mouth-to-mouth ventilation performance in both the BLS class and 6 months later. Despite the respiratory mechanics of the CPR manikin which prevented stomach inflation much better than an unconscious patient with an unprotected airway, stomach inflation occurred repeatedly. Teachers of basic life support classes need to consider the respiratory mechanics of the CPR manikin being used to assure clinically realistic and appropriate mouth-to-mouth ventilation skills.

KW - Artificial respiration

KW - Basic life support

KW - Cardiac arrest

KW - Manikin

KW - Resuscitation

KW - Retention

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0030924495&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0030924495&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0300-9572(97)00044-0

DO - 10.1016/S0300-9572(97)00044-0

M3 - Article

C2 - 9316196

AN - SCOPUS:0030924495

VL - 35

SP - 129

EP - 134

JO - Resuscitation

JF - Resuscitation

SN - 0300-9572

IS - 2

ER -