Population-based study of statins, angiotensin II receptor blockers, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors on pneumonia-related outcomes

Eric M. Mortensen, Brandy Nakashima, John Cornell, Laurel A. Copeland, Mary Jo Pugh, Antonio Anzueto, Chester Good, Marcos I. Restrepo, John R. Downs, Christopher R. Frei, Michael J. Fine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

92 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background.Studies suggest that statins and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors might be beneficial for the treatment of infections. Our purpose was to examine the association of statin, ACE inhibitor, and angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) use with pneumonia-related outcomes.Methods.We conducted a retrospective cohort study using Department of Veterans Affairs data of patients aged ≥65 years hospitalized with pneumonia. We performed propensity-score matching for 3 medication classes simultaneously.Results.Of 50 119 potentially eligible patients, we matched 11 498 cases with 11 498 controls. Mortality at 30 days was 13; 34 used statins, 30 ACE inhibitors, and 4 ARBs. In adjusted models, prior statin use was associated with decreased mortality (odds ratio [OR], 0.74; 95 confidence interval [CI],. 68-.82) and mechanical ventilation (OR, 0.81; 95 CI,. 70-.94), and inpatient use with decreased mortality (OR, 0.68; 95 CI,. 59-.78) and mechanical ventilation (OR, 0.68; 95 CI,. 60-.90). Prior (OR, 0.88; 95 CI,. 80-.97) and inpatient (OR, 0.58; 95 CI,. 48-.69) ACE inhibitor use was associated with decreased mortality. Prior (OR, 0.73; 95 CI,. 58-.92) and inpatient ARB use (OR, 0.47; 95 CI,. 30-.72) was only associated with decreased mortality. Use of all 3 medications was associated with reduced length of stay.Conclusions.Statins, and to a lesser extent ACE inhibitors and ARBs, are associated with improved pneumonia-related outcomes. Prospective cohort and randomized controlled trials are needed to examine potential mechanisms of action and whether acute initiation at the time of presentation with these infections is beneficial.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1466-1473
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume55
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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