Population structure and history in East Asia

Yuan Chun Ding, Stephen Wooding, Henry C. Harpending, Han Chang Chi, Hai Peng Li, Yun Xin Fu, Jun Feng Pang, Yong Gang Yao, Jing Gong Xiang Yu, Robert Moyzis, Ya Ping Zhang

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86 Scopus citations

Abstract

Archaeological, anatomical, linguistic, and genetic data have suggested that there is an old and significant boundary between the populations of north and south China. We use three human genetic marker systems and one human-carried virus to examine the north/south distinction. We find no support for a major north/south division in these markers; rather, the marker patterns suggest simple isolation by distance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)14003-14006
Number of pages4
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume97
Issue number25
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 5 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

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    Ding, Y. C., Wooding, S., Harpending, H. C., Chi, H. C., Li, H. P., Fu, Y. X., Pang, J. F., Yao, Y. G., Yu, J. G. X., Moyzis, R., & Zhang, Y. P. (2000). Population structure and history in East Asia. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 97(25), 14003-14006. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.240441297