Postmortem stability and characterization of immunoreactive luteinizing hormone releasing hormone and thyrotropin releasing hormone in human brain tissue

C. Richard Parker, John C. Porter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

PARKER, C. R., JR. AND J. C. PORTER. Postmortem stability and characterization of immunoreactive luteinizing hormone releasing hormone and thyrotropin releasing hormone in human brain tissue. BRAIN RES. BULL. 8(6) 623-630, 1982.-The content and concentration of immunoreactive luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) and of thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) were evaluated in hypothalamic tissue of 52 cadavers of adult humans (33 males, 18 to 70 years of age, and 19 females, 17 to 74 years of age). Autopsy was performed between 2.5 and 21 hr after death. When the data were subjected to linear regression analysis, it was found that neither the concentration nor content of LHRH or TRH varied significantly between 2.5 and 21 hr postmortem. The stability of LHRH or TRH in hypothalamic fragments that included the pituitary stalk was similar to the stability of these peptides in hypothalamic fragments that did not include the pituitary stalk. The concentration as well as content of LHRH and TRH in specimens analyzed 2.5 to 12 hr postmortem was similar to that in specimens analyzed 13 to 21 hr postmortem. When aliquots of a homogenate or a synaptosomal fraction of hypothalamic tissue were incubated at 4° or 37°C prior to the analysis of endogenous LHRH and TRH, it was found that the concentration of each peptide remained constant for several hours. However, when synthetic LHRH or TRH was mixed with aliquots of homogenates or subcellular fractions of hypothalamic tissue and incubated at 37°C, each exogenous peptide was rapidly degraded. Based upon the results of gel filtration chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, biological activity (LHRH), and susceptibility to degradation by serum (TRH), immunoreactive LHRH and TRH in extracts of human brain tissue appeared to be similar to synthetic LHRH and TRH. These findings support the view that, although human brain tissue has the capacity to degrade LHRH and TRH, the endogenous pools of these peptides are sequestered in such a manner that they are stable for several hours in the postmortem human brain. These data are suggestive that brain tissues obtained at autopsy may be useful in the study of peptidergic systems in the human.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)623-630
Number of pages8
JournalBrain Research Bulletin
Volume8
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1982

Keywords

  • Chromatography
  • Human brain
  • Luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH)
  • Neural peptide
  • Peptidase
  • Thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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