Practical aspects and considerations when switching between continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and multiple daily injections

Luigi Meneghini, Jane Sparrow-Bodenmiller

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Insulin pump therapy is considered the gold standard for insulin management in patients requiring full physiologic insulin replacement. Compared to traditional delivery of short- and long-acting insulin preparations by multiple daily insulin injections, delivery of insulin via continuous subcutaneous infusion brings with it several advantages, which in the past have translated into better glycemic control and treatment satisfaction. Delivery of insulin via pump reduces the number needle insertions (from four or five per day to once every 2-3 days), allows for greater flexibility of insulin delivery with regard to both the basal and prandial component, facilitates portability of the insulin preparation, and allows for more accurate dosing. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion does have some drawbacks, including a greater risk of inadvertent insulin non-delivery, greater costs of therapy, and the need to be "tethered" with some systems that might be considered "burdensome" or even undesirable to some patients. For the most part patients who initiate insulin pump therapy are satisfied and continue using the technology, but there might be instances that arise that require the re-introduction of insulin delivery by pen or syringe. This article will review some of the reasons and strategies for switching from one mode of delivery to the other.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S109-S114
JournalDiabetes Technology and Therapeutics
Volume12
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 6 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology
  • Medical Laboratory Technology

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