Practical diagnosis and management of dementia due to Alzheimer's disease in the primary care setting: An evidence-based approach

David S. Geldmacher, Diana R. Kerwin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To review evidence-based guidance on the primary care of Alzheimer's disease and clinical research on models of primary care for Alzheimer's disease to present a practical summary for the primary care physician regarding the assessment and management of the disease. Data Sources: References were obtained via PubMed search using keywords Alzheimer's disease AND primary care OR collaborative care OR case finding OR caregivers OR guidelines. Articles were limited to English language from January 1, 1990, to January 1, 2013. Study Selection: Articles were reviewed and selected on the basis of study quality and pertinence to this topic, covering a broad range of data and opinion across geographical regions and systems of care. The most recent published guidelines from major organizations were included. Results: Practice guidelines contained numerous points of consensus, with most advocating a central role for the primary care physician in the detection, diagnosis, and treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Review of the literature indicated that optimal medical and psychosocial care for people with Alzheimer's disease and their caregivers may be best facilitated through collaborative models of care involving the primary care physician working within a wider interdisciplinary team. Conclusions: Evidence-based guidelines assign the primary care physician a critical role in the care of people with Alzheimer's disease. Research on models of care suggests the need for an appropriate medical/nonmedical support network to fulfill this role. Given the diversity and breadth of services required and the necessity for close coordination, nationwide implementation of team-based, collaborative care programs may represent the best option for improving care standards for patients with Alzheimer's disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPrimary Care Companion to the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 23 2013

Fingerprint

Dementia
Primary Health Care
Alzheimer Disease
Primary Care Physicians
Guidelines
Caregivers
Information Storage and Retrieval
Standard of Care
Disease Management
Practice Guidelines
Research
PubMed
Consensus
Language

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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abstract = "Objective: To review evidence-based guidance on the primary care of Alzheimer's disease and clinical research on models of primary care for Alzheimer's disease to present a practical summary for the primary care physician regarding the assessment and management of the disease. Data Sources: References were obtained via PubMed search using keywords Alzheimer's disease AND primary care OR collaborative care OR case finding OR caregivers OR guidelines. Articles were limited to English language from January 1, 1990, to January 1, 2013. Study Selection: Articles were reviewed and selected on the basis of study quality and pertinence to this topic, covering a broad range of data and opinion across geographical regions and systems of care. The most recent published guidelines from major organizations were included. Results: Practice guidelines contained numerous points of consensus, with most advocating a central role for the primary care physician in the detection, diagnosis, and treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Review of the literature indicated that optimal medical and psychosocial care for people with Alzheimer's disease and their caregivers may be best facilitated through collaborative models of care involving the primary care physician working within a wider interdisciplinary team. Conclusions: Evidence-based guidelines assign the primary care physician a critical role in the care of people with Alzheimer's disease. Research on models of care suggests the need for an appropriate medical/nonmedical support network to fulfill this role. Given the diversity and breadth of services required and the necessity for close coordination, nationwide implementation of team-based, collaborative care programs may represent the best option for improving care standards for patients with Alzheimer's disease.",
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