Practice patterns using minimally invasive surgery for the treatment of ovarian cancer: A survey of physician members of the Society of Gynecologic Oncologists

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Abstract

Retrospective studies suggest that minimally-invasive surgery may be safe and effective for the treatment of early-stage ovarian cancer as well as interval cytoreduction after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Adoption rates and attitudes towards its use remain largely unknown. We aimed to determine the current use of minimally-invasive surgery for the treatment of ovarian cancer and identify perceived barriers towards further adoption of this method. Electronic survey was administered to physician members of the Society of Gynecologic Oncology. Chi-square analysis was used to determine if any correlation existed between variables and the current use of minimally invasive surgery in general practice and, specifically, for the treatment of ovarian cancer. There was a survey response rate of 15.1%. Sixty-five percent of respondents practiced in an academic setting, and 32.1% of respondents had completed fellowship training within the past 5 years. Ninety percent of respondents were performing >50% of their current procedures using minimally invasive surgery. Over seventy percent of respondents said that they performed minimally invasive surgery for primary staging and interval cytoreductive surgery for the treatment of ovarian cancer. Concern for residual disease and lack of scientific validation were the most frequently cited barriers to the implementation of minimally invasive surgery for the treatment of ovarian cancer. A majority of respondents have adopted the use of MIS for the management of early stage ovarian cancer. Advances in imaging to detect occult tumor deposits and a randomized trial to study and promote the use of minimally invasive surgery in ovarian cancer is warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number100617
JournalGynecologic Oncology Reports
Volume33
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2020

Keywords

  • Advanced laparoscopy
  • Gynecologic cancer
  • Interval cytoreductive surgery
  • Laparoscopic surgery
  • Neoadjuvant chemotherapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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