Practices to Reduce Surgical Site Infections among Women Undergoing Cesarean Section

A Review

Rebeccah A. McKibben, Samantha I. Pitts, Catalina Suarez-Cuervo, Trish M. Perl, Eric B. Bass

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE Surgical site infections (SSIs) are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among women undergoing cesarean section (C-section), a common procedure in North America. While risk factors for SSI are often modifiable, wide variation in clinical practice exists. With this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of the results and quality of systematic reviews and meta-analyses on interventions to reduce surgical site infections among women undergoing C-section. METHODS We searched PubMed and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews for systematic reviews and meta-analyses published between January 2000 and May 2014 on interventions to reduce the occurrence of SSIs (incisional infections and endometritis), among women undergoing C-section. We extracted data on the interventions, outcomes, and strength of evidence as determined by the original article authors, and assessed the quality of each article based on a modified Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews tool. RESULTS A total of 30 review articles met inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Among these articles, 77 distinct interventions were evaluated: 29% were supported with strong evidence as assessed by the original article authors, and 83% of the reviews articles were classified as good quality based on our assessment. Ten interventions were classified as being effective in reducing SSI with strong evidence in a good-quality article, including preoperative vaginal cleansing, the use of perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis, and several surgical techniques. CONCLUSION Efforts to reduce SSI rates among women undergoing C-section should include interventions such as preoperative vaginal cleansing and the use of perioperative antibiotics because compelling evidence exists to support their effectiveness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)915-921
Number of pages7
JournalInfection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Volume36
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Surgical Wound Infection
Cesarean Section
Meta-Analysis
Endometritis
Antibiotic Prophylaxis
North America
PubMed
Databases
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Morbidity
Mortality
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Practices to Reduce Surgical Site Infections among Women Undergoing Cesarean Section : A Review. / McKibben, Rebeccah A.; Pitts, Samantha I.; Suarez-Cuervo, Catalina; Perl, Trish M.; Bass, Eric B.

In: Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, Vol. 36, No. 8, 01.01.2015, p. 915-921.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McKibben, Rebeccah A. ; Pitts, Samantha I. ; Suarez-Cuervo, Catalina ; Perl, Trish M. ; Bass, Eric B. / Practices to Reduce Surgical Site Infections among Women Undergoing Cesarean Section : A Review. In: Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology. 2015 ; Vol. 36, No. 8. pp. 915-921.
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