Pre-existing self-reactive IgA antibodies associated with primary graft dysfunction after lung transplantation

Vaidehi Kaza, Chengsong Zhu, Leying Feng, Fernando Torres, Srinivas Bollineni, Manish Mohanka, Amit Banga, John Joerns, T. Mohanakumar, Lance S. Terada, Quan Zhen Li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Primary graft Dysfunction (PGD) results in significant mortality and morbidity after lung transplantation (LT). The objective of this study was to evaluate if pre-existing antibodies to self-antigens in sera of LT recipients are associated with PGD. Methods: The serum profiles of IgG and IgA autoantibodies were analyzed using a customized proteomic microarray bearing 124 autoantigens. Autoantibodies were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test or Fisher exact test. The association of the autoantibodies with clinical phenotypes and survival was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier Survival Analysis. Receiver operating curve characteristics (ROC) were calculated to evaluate the predictive value of the autoantibodies for PGD. Results: 51 patients were included in this study. Autoantigen microarray analysis on the pre-transplantation samples identified 17 IgA and 3 IgG autoantibodies which were significantly higher in recipients who developed PGD compared to those who did not (adjusted p <.05 and fold change>1.5). 6 IgA Abs were significantly associated with survival. Taken as a panel, an elevation of 6 IgA Abs had significant predictive value for PGD. Area under the curve value for the panel was 0.9413 for PGD with ROC analysis. Notably, 6 of the 17 IgA autoantigen targets are belong to proteoglycan family of extracellular matrix proteins. Conclusion: Pre-existing IgG and IgA autoantibodies in LT patients correlate with PGD and with survival in a single center, small cohort of lung transplant recipients. Further validation is needed to confirm the findings in the study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number101271
JournalTransplant Immunology
Volume59
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2020

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Keywords

  • Autoantibodies
  • Lung transplantation
  • Primary graft dysfunction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Transplantation

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