Predictors of linkage to hepatitis C virus care among people living with HIV with hepatitis C infection and the impact of loss to HIV follow-up

Abby A. Lau, Joslyn K. Strebe, Teena V. Sura, Laura A. Hansen, Mamta K. Jain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: Half of the people living with HIV (PLWH) with hepatitis C virus (HCV) remain untreated for HCV. We examined predictors of HCV linkage to care among PLWH and the impact of HIV lost to care. Design and methods: We conducted a retrospective review of PLWH/HCV from our HIV clinics between 2014 and 2017, and examined predictors of HCV linkage to care. We used the Kaplan–Meier method to estimate the probability of HIV retention and HCV linkage over time. Results: Of 615 PLWH/HCV, 34% linked to HCV care and 21% were cured. Higher odds of linkage to HCV care were among blacks (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 2.95, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.59, 5.47), prior injection drug users (IDUs; aOR: 2.89, 95% CI: 1.39, 6.01), Medicare (aOR: 3.09, 95% CI: 1.56, 6.11), and cirrhotics (aOR: 2.80, 95% CI: 1.52, 5.14). Reduced odds for linkage were in active IDU (aOR: 0.16, 95% CI: 0.05, 0.45) and those seen by an advanced practice provider (aOR: 0.53, 95% CI: 0.30, 0.92). The main reason for failure to link to HCV care was lost to HIV care. At 3 years, the overall probability of being retained in HIV care was 53%; among those who had an HCV evaluation visit, it was 75% vs. 41% with no HCV evaluation visit. Accounting for loss to follow-up, PLWH/HCV had a 65% probability of having an HCV evaluation at 3 years.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere645
JournalHealth Science Reports
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2022

Keywords

  • cascade of care
  • hepatitis C virus (HCV)
  • HIV
  • linkage to care
  • lost to follow-up

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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