Predictors of long-term mortality after severe sepsis in the elderly

Allyson C. Lemay, Antonio Anzueto, Marcos I. Restrepo, Eric M. Mortensen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND:: Mortality rates after severe sepsis are extremely high, and the main focus of most research is short-term mortality, which may not be associated with long-term outcomes. The purpose of this study was to examine long-term mortality after a severe sepsis and identify factors associated with this mortality. METHODS:: The authors performed a population-based study using Veterans' Affairs administrative data of patients aged 65 years and older. The outcome of interest was mortality > 90 days following hospitalization. Our primary analyses were Cox proportional hazard models to examine specific risk factors for long-term mortality. RESULTS:: There were 2,727 patients that met the inclusion criteria. Overall mortality was 55%, and 1- and 2-year mortality rates were 31% and 43%, respectively. Factors significantly associated with long-term mortality included congestive heart failure, peripheral vascular disease, dementia, diabetes with complications and use of mechanical ventilation. Smoking cessation and cardiac medications were associated with decreased long-term mortality rates. CONCLUSIONS:: The authors identified several factors, including receipt of mechanical ventilation, which were significantly associated with increased long-term mortality for survivors of severe sepsis. This information will help clinicians discuss prognosis with patients and their families.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)282-288
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of the Medical Sciences
Volume347
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Sepsis
Mortality
Artificial Respiration
Vascular Dementia
Peripheral Vascular Diseases
Veterans
Smoking Cessation
Diabetes Complications
Proportional Hazards Models
Survivors
Hospitalization
Heart Failure
Research

Keywords

  • Comorbid conditions
  • Mortality
  • Predictors
  • Sepsis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Predictors of long-term mortality after severe sepsis in the elderly. / Lemay, Allyson C.; Anzueto, Antonio; Restrepo, Marcos I.; Mortensen, Eric M.

In: American Journal of the Medical Sciences, Vol. 347, No. 4, 2014, p. 282-288.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lemay, Allyson C. ; Anzueto, Antonio ; Restrepo, Marcos I. ; Mortensen, Eric M. / Predictors of long-term mortality after severe sepsis in the elderly. In: American Journal of the Medical Sciences. 2014 ; Vol. 347, No. 4. pp. 282-288.
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