Presence and Extent of Coronary Artery Disease by Cardiac Computed Tomography and Risk for Acute Coronary Syndrome in Cocaine Users Among Patients With Chest Pain

Fabian Bamberg, Christopher L. Schlett, Quynh A. Truong, Ian S. Rogers, Wolfgang Koenig, John T. Nagurney, Sujith Seneviratne, Sam J. Lehman, Ricardo C. Cury, Suhny Abbara, Javed Butler, Hang Lee, Thomas J. Brady, Udo Hoffmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cocaine users represent an emergency department (ED) population that has been shown to be at increased risk for acute coronary syndrome (ACS); however, there is controversy about whether this higher risk is mediated through advanced atherosclerosis. Thus, we aimed to determine whether history of cocaine use is associated with ACS and coronary artery disease. In this matched cohort study, we selected patients with a history of cocaine use and age- and gender-matched controls from a large cohort of consecutive patients who presented with acute chest pain to the ED. Coronary atherosclerotic plaque as detected by 64-slice coronary computed tomography was compared between the groups. Among 412 patients, 44 had a history of cocaine use (9%) and were matched to 132 controls (mean age 46 ± 6 years, 86% men). History of cocaine use was associated with a sixfold higher risk for ACS (odds ratio 5.79, 95% confidence interval 1.24 to 27.02, p = 0.02), but was not associated with a higher prevalence of any plaque, calcified plaque, or noncalcified plaque (all p>0.58) or the presence of significant stenosis (p = 0.09). History of cocaine use was also not associated with the extent of any, calcified, or noncalcified plaque (all p>0.12). These associations persisted after adjustment for other cardiovascular risk factors. In conclusion, in patients presenting to the emergency department with acute chest pain, history of cocaine use is associated with an increase in risk for ACS; however, this was not attributable to a higher presence or extent of coronary atherosclerotic plaque.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)620-625
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume103
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2009

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Acute Coronary Syndrome
Chest Pain
Cocaine
Coronary Artery Disease
Tomography
Hospital Emergency Service
Acute Pain
Atherosclerotic Plaques
Atherosclerosis
Pathologic Constriction
Cohort Studies
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Presence and Extent of Coronary Artery Disease by Cardiac Computed Tomography and Risk for Acute Coronary Syndrome in Cocaine Users Among Patients With Chest Pain. / Bamberg, Fabian; Schlett, Christopher L.; Truong, Quynh A.; Rogers, Ian S.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Nagurney, John T.; Seneviratne, Sujith; Lehman, Sam J.; Cury, Ricardo C.; Abbara, Suhny; Butler, Javed; Lee, Hang; Brady, Thomas J.; Hoffmann, Udo.

In: American Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 103, No. 5, 01.03.2009, p. 620-625.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bamberg, F, Schlett, CL, Truong, QA, Rogers, IS, Koenig, W, Nagurney, JT, Seneviratne, S, Lehman, SJ, Cury, RC, Abbara, S, Butler, J, Lee, H, Brady, TJ & Hoffmann, U 2009, 'Presence and Extent of Coronary Artery Disease by Cardiac Computed Tomography and Risk for Acute Coronary Syndrome in Cocaine Users Among Patients With Chest Pain', American Journal of Cardiology, vol. 103, no. 5, pp. 620-625. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2008.11.011
Bamberg, Fabian ; Schlett, Christopher L. ; Truong, Quynh A. ; Rogers, Ian S. ; Koenig, Wolfgang ; Nagurney, John T. ; Seneviratne, Sujith ; Lehman, Sam J. ; Cury, Ricardo C. ; Abbara, Suhny ; Butler, Javed ; Lee, Hang ; Brady, Thomas J. ; Hoffmann, Udo. / Presence and Extent of Coronary Artery Disease by Cardiac Computed Tomography and Risk for Acute Coronary Syndrome in Cocaine Users Among Patients With Chest Pain. In: American Journal of Cardiology. 2009 ; Vol. 103, No. 5. pp. 620-625.
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AU - Koenig, Wolfgang

AU - Nagurney, John T.

AU - Seneviratne, Sujith

AU - Lehman, Sam J.

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AU - Butler, Javed

AU - Lee, Hang

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