Preservation solutions for static cold storage in donation after circulatory death and donation after brain death liver transplantation in the United States

Thomas G. Cotter, Matthew A. Odenwald, Angelica Perez-Gutierrez, Kumar Jayant, Diego DiSabato, Michael Charlton, John Fung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Static cold preservation remains the cornerstone for storing donor livers following procurement; however, the choice between University of Wisconsin solution (UW) and histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate solution (HTK) remains controversial. Recent International Liver Transplantation Society (ILTS) guidelines have recommended avoiding HTK for donation after circulatory death (DCD) grafts based on older reports. We studied the latest US adult graft outcomes in three recent eras (2006–2010, 2011–2015, 2016–2020) comparing HTK and UW among 5956 DCD LTs: 3873 (65.0%) used UW and 1944 (32.7%) used HTK. In a total of 82,679 donation after brain death (DBD) liver transplantations (LTs), 63,511 (76.8%) used UW and 15,855 (19.2%) used HTK. The HTK group had higher 1-year and 5-year graft survival rates of 89.7% and 74.3%, respectively, compared with 85.9% and 70.8% in the UW group in the 2016–2020 era (p = 0.005). This difference remained when adjusted for important potential confounders (hazard ratio, 0.78; 95% confidence interval: 0.60, 0.99). There were no differences between groups among DCD LTs in the earlier eras or among DBD LTs in all eras (all p values > 0.05). The latest US data suggest that HTK is at least noninferior to UW for preserving DCD livers. These data support HTK use in DCD LT and contradict ILTS guidance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalLiver Transplantation
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Hepatology
  • Transplantation

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Preservation solutions for static cold storage in donation after circulatory death and donation after brain death liver transplantation in the United States'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this