Prevalence of abnormal serum aminotransferase values in overweight and obese adolescents

Richard S. Strauss, Sarah E. Barlow, William H. Dietz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

316 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: (1) To determine the prevalence of abnormal liver enzymes in overweight and obese adolescents and (2) to determine the relationship of alcohol ingestion and serum antioxidants to the presence of abnormal liver enzymes in overweight and obese adolescents. Methods: Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase levels were measured in 2450 children between the ages of 12 and 18 years, enrolled in the National Health and Examination Survey, cycle III (NHANES III). Obesity was defined as a body mass index >95th percentile for age and sex. Overweight was defined as a body mass index >85th percentile for age and sex. Nutritional intake was assessed by 24-hour dietary recall and food frequency questionnaires. Serum antioxidants were measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Results: Sixty percent of adolescents with elevated ALT levels were either overweight or obese. Overall, 6% of overweight adolescents had elevated ALT levels (odds ratio: 3.4 [95% CI: 3.5-12.8]). Ten percent of obese adolescents had elevated ALT levels (odds ratio: 6.7 [95% CI: 3.5-12.8]). In addition, approximately 1% of obese adolescents demonstrated ALT levels over twice normal. Approximately 50% of of obsese adolescents who reported modest alcohol ingestion (4 times per month or more) had elevated ALT levels (odds ratio: 10.8, 95% CI: 1.5-77). Other factors associated with elevated ALT levels in overweight and obese adolescents include increased age, elevated glycolated hemoglobin elevated triglycerides, and decreased levels of serum antioxidants-vitamin E, β-carotene, and vitamin C. Conclusion: Overweight and obesity are the most common findings in adolescents with elevated ALT revels. Even modest alcohol consumption may significantly increase the likelihood of obese adolescents developing obesity-related liver disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)727-733
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume136
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

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Transaminases
Alanine Transaminase
Serum
Antioxidants
Odds Ratio
Body Mass Index
Obesity
Eating
Alcohols
gamma-Glutamyltransferase
Pediatric Obesity
Liver
Enzymes
Carotenoids
Health Surveys
Vitamin E
Alcohol Drinking
Ascorbic Acid
Liver Diseases
Hemoglobins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Prevalence of abnormal serum aminotransferase values in overweight and obese adolescents. / Strauss, Richard S.; Barlow, Sarah E.; Dietz, William H.

In: Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 136, No. 6, 01.01.2000, p. 727-733.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Strauss, Richard S. ; Barlow, Sarah E. ; Dietz, William H. / Prevalence of abnormal serum aminotransferase values in overweight and obese adolescents. In: Journal of Pediatrics. 2000 ; Vol. 136, No. 6. pp. 727-733.
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