Prevalence of human papillomavirus genotypes in HIV-1-infected women in Seattle, USA and Nairobi, Kenya: Results from the Women's HIV Interdisciplinary Network (WHIN)

Amneris E. Luque, Jane Hitti, Christina Mwachari, Christopher Lane, Susan Messing, Susan E. Cohn, David Adler, Robert Rose, Robert Coombs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: HIV-infected women have a high prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and are more likely to be infected with HPV genotypes that are considered high-risk and have the potential for progressing to cervical cancer. The currently available HPV vaccines protect against specific HPV genotypes that may not be the most important causes of dysplasia and potentially of cervical cancer in HIV-1-infected women. African women have been underrepresented in the studies of global prevalence of HPV genotypes. Methods: We compared the HPV genotype distribution in HIV-1-infected women from Seattle, Washington, USA and Nairobi, Kenya. The reverse line blot assay and DNA sequencing on cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) specimens were carried out. Results: The most commonly detected HPV types among the women from Seattle were HPV 56, 66, MM8, and 81; in contrast HPV 53, 33, and 58 were the most common HPV genotypes detected in the CVL specimens from the women in the Nairobi cohort. The HPV types associated with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) were HPV 53 and HPV 56. HPV types 58, 52, and 16 were associated with high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL). Conclusions: A better understanding of HPV genotype distribution in the most affected regions of the world is essential to planning effective vaccine strategies if we are unable to demonstrate cross-protection between HPV genotypes included in the present vaccines and those prevalent in the different populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalInternational Journal of Infectious Diseases
Volume14
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2010

Fingerprint

Kenya
HIV-1
Genotype
HIV
Therapeutic Irrigation
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Vaccines
Cross Protection
Papillomavirus Vaccines
Papillomavirus Infections
Human papillomavirus 16
DNA Sequence Analysis

Keywords

  • Cervical dysplasia
  • HIV-infected women
  • HPV genotypes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Prevalence of human papillomavirus genotypes in HIV-1-infected women in Seattle, USA and Nairobi, Kenya : Results from the Women's HIV Interdisciplinary Network (WHIN). / Luque, Amneris E.; Hitti, Jane; Mwachari, Christina; Lane, Christopher; Messing, Susan; Cohn, Susan E.; Adler, David; Rose, Robert; Coombs, Robert.

In: International Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 14, No. 9, 01.09.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Luque, Amneris E. ; Hitti, Jane ; Mwachari, Christina ; Lane, Christopher ; Messing, Susan ; Cohn, Susan E. ; Adler, David ; Rose, Robert ; Coombs, Robert. / Prevalence of human papillomavirus genotypes in HIV-1-infected women in Seattle, USA and Nairobi, Kenya : Results from the Women's HIV Interdisciplinary Network (WHIN). In: International Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2010 ; Vol. 14, No. 9.
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abstract = "Background: HIV-infected women have a high prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and are more likely to be infected with HPV genotypes that are considered high-risk and have the potential for progressing to cervical cancer. The currently available HPV vaccines protect against specific HPV genotypes that may not be the most important causes of dysplasia and potentially of cervical cancer in HIV-1-infected women. African women have been underrepresented in the studies of global prevalence of HPV genotypes. Methods: We compared the HPV genotype distribution in HIV-1-infected women from Seattle, Washington, USA and Nairobi, Kenya. The reverse line blot assay and DNA sequencing on cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) specimens were carried out. Results: The most commonly detected HPV types among the women from Seattle were HPV 56, 66, MM8, and 81; in contrast HPV 53, 33, and 58 were the most common HPV genotypes detected in the CVL specimens from the women in the Nairobi cohort. The HPV types associated with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) were HPV 53 and HPV 56. HPV types 58, 52, and 16 were associated with high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL). Conclusions: A better understanding of HPV genotype distribution in the most affected regions of the world is essential to planning effective vaccine strategies if we are unable to demonstrate cross-protection between HPV genotypes included in the present vaccines and those prevalent in the different populations.",
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