Prevalence of vitamin D deficiency among overweight and obese us children

Christy B. Turer, Hua Lin, Glenn Flores

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

147 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Adequate vitamin D is essential for skeletal health in developing children. Although excess body weight is associated with risk of vitamin D deficiency, the national prevalence of and risk factors associated with vitamin D deficiency in overweight and obese children are unknown. METHODS: The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency (defined as 25- hydroxyvitamin-D ,20 ng/mL) was determined in a sample of 6- to 18-year-old children who were enrolled in a cross-sectional study (the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey) in which body weight and height were measured directly. Children were classified as healthy-weight, overweight, obese, or severely obese by using recommended age- and gender-specificBMI-percentile cut points. Associations between BMI-percentile classification and vitamin D deficiency were examined after adjustment for relevant confounders. Sample weights were used to generate nationally representative estimates. RESULTS: The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in healthy-weight, overweight, obese, and severely obese children was 21% (20%- 22%), 29% (27%-31%), 34% (32%-36%), and 49% (45%-53%), respectively. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in severely obese white, Latino, and African-American children was 27% (3%-51%), 52% (36%- 68%), and 87% (81%-93%), respectively. Compared with healthyweight children, overweight, obese, and severely obese children had significantly greater adjusted odds of vitamin D deficiency. Modifiable factors associated with vitamin D deficiency in overweight/obese children were identified. CONCLUSIONS: Vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent in overweight and obese children. The particularly high prevalence in severely obese and minority children suggests that targeted screening and treatment guidance is needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPediatrics
Volume131
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2013

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Vitamin D Deficiency
Weights and Measures
Vitamin D
Body Weight
Body Height
Nutrition Surveys
Hispanic Americans
African Americans
Cross-Sectional Studies

Keywords

  • Disparities
  • Obesity
  • Prevalence
  • Screening
  • Vitamin D

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Prevalence of vitamin D deficiency among overweight and obese us children. / Turer, Christy B.; Lin, Hua; Flores, Glenn.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 131, No. 1, 01.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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