Primary sources of pelvic serous cancer in patients with endometrial intraepithelial carcinoma

Lin Jia, Zeng Yuan, Yiying Wang, Janiel M. Cragun, Beihua Kong, Wenxin Zheng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Serous endometrial intraepithelial carcinoma is often associated with extrauterine disease. It is currently unclear where does the extrauterine disease come from. This study addressed this issue. A total of 135 samples from 21 serous endometrial intraepithelial carcinoma patients were studied. Cellular lineage relationships between intrauterine and extrauterine serous carcinomas were determined by TP53-mutation analysis and correlated to the clinicopathologic features. There were three conditions contributing the extrauterine disease: metastasis from serous endometrial intraepithelial carcinoma (n=10) showed identical TP53 mutation between intrauterine lesions and extrauterine disease, cases of adnexal origin (n=5) had discordant TP53 mutations, and the mixed cellular origin cases (n=6) with both identical and discordant mutation status. Patients with extrauterine disease from serous endometrial intraepithelial carcinoma metastasis typically had small tumor masses (<2 cm) in extrauterine sites and without finding of serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma, while extrauterine disease with adnexal or tubal origin commonly had larger tumor masses in extrauterine sites including ovary and omentum and serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma. The majority of extrauterine diseases associated with serous endometrial intraepithelial carcinoma are metastasized from the endometrium. Serous endometrial intraepithelial carcinoma is frequently associated with serous cancers of adnexal or tubal origin, indicating that endometrial and adnexal or tubal serous cancers may share similar etiologies. TP53-mutation analysis provides a strong linkage for cellular lineage analysis. Tumor size in extrauterine disease and presence of serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma or not are useful clinicopathologic features to determine primary cancer site, which helps in clinical management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)118-127
Number of pages10
JournalModern Pathology
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 10 2015

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

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