Prolactin levels in umbilical cord blood of human infants: Relation to gestational age, maternal complications, and neonatal lung function

C. Richard Parker, Paul C. MacDonald, David S. Guzick, John C. Porter, Charles R. Rosenfeld, John C. Hauth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The ontogeny of serum prolactin and its relation to several variables, especially lung function, in 543 neonates was studied. Umbilical cord serum prolactin levels rose between 24 and 42 weeks' gestation, correlating significantly (p < 0.001) with gestational age (r = 0.44) and birth weight (r = 0.32). Among infants of similar ages, however, there was no variation in serum prolactin level as a function of birth weight, sex, Apgar scores, or delivery method. Infants of women with pregnancy-induced hypertension had higher than normal prolactin levels; infants of diabetic women had normal prolactin levels. At 31.5 to 37 weeks' gestation, infants who developed respiratory distress syndrome had lower serum prolactin levels than those whose lung function was normal or else was abnormal from causes other than respiratory distress syndrome. The risk for respiratory distress syndrome was higher in newborns whose prolactin level was low (10th percentile) than in infants whose prolactin level was high (90th percentile). These results are suggestive that prolactin may play a role in fetal lung maturation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)795-802
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume161
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1989

Fingerprint

Surrogate Mothers
Fetal Blood
Prolactin
Gestational Age
Lung
Serum
Birth Weight
Newborn Infant
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Induced Hypertension
Apgar Score
Umbilical Cord

Keywords

  • human fetal lung
  • hyaline membrane disease
  • pregnancy
  • Prolactin
  • respiratory distress syndrome (RDS)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Prolactin levels in umbilical cord blood of human infants : Relation to gestational age, maternal complications, and neonatal lung function. / Parker, C. Richard; MacDonald, Paul C.; Guzick, David S.; Porter, John C.; Rosenfeld, Charles R.; Hauth, John C.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 161, No. 3, 1989, p. 795-802.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Parker, C. Richard ; MacDonald, Paul C. ; Guzick, David S. ; Porter, John C. ; Rosenfeld, Charles R. ; Hauth, John C. / Prolactin levels in umbilical cord blood of human infants : Relation to gestational age, maternal complications, and neonatal lung function. In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 1989 ; Vol. 161, No. 3. pp. 795-802.
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