Prolonged hemodynamic stability during arteriovenous carbon dioxide removal for severe respiratory failure

Jr Brunston R.L., W. Tao, A. Bidani, S. K. Alpard, D. L. Traber, J. B. Zwischenberger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: The effects of prolonged arteriovenous carbon dioxide removal on hemodynamics during severe respiratory failure were evaluated in adult sheep with severe smoke inhalation injury. Methods: Adult female sheep (n = 6, 33.8 ± 5.2 kg) were subjected to intratracheal cotton severe smoke insufflation to a mean carboxyhemoglobin level of 83% ± 3%. Twenty-four hours after injury, a low-resistance 2.5 m2 membrane oxygenator was placed in a carotid-to-jugular pumpless arteriovenous shunt at unrestricted flow to allow complete carbon dioxide removal and reductions in ventilator support. Animals remained conscious, and heart rate, cardiac output, mean arterial pressure, and pulmonary arterial pressure were measured at baseline, after injury, and daily during support with the arteriovenous carbon dioxide removal circuit for 7 days. Results: All animals survived the study period. Carbon dioxide removal ranged from 99.7 ± 13.7 to 152.2 ± 16.2 ml/min, and five (83%) of the six animals were successfully weaned from the ventilator before day 7. During full support with the arteriovenous carbon dioxide removal circuit, shunt flow ranged from 1.24 ± 0.06 to 1.43 ± 0.08 L/min and accounted for 20.1% ± 1.4% to 25.9% ± 2.4% of cardiac output. No statistically significant changes in heart rate, cardiac output, mean arterial pressure, or pulmonary artery pressure were demonstrated over the study course despite the extracorporeal shunt flow. Conclusions: Arteriovenous carbon dioxide removal as a simplified means of extracorporeal gas exchange support is relatively safe without adverse hemodynamic effects or complications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1107-1114
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume114
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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