Promoting HPV vaccination in safety-net clinics: A randomized trial

Jasmin A. Tiro, Joanne M. Sanders, Sandi L. Pruitt, Clare Frey Stevens, Celette Sugg Skinner, Wendy P. Bishop, Sobha Fuller, Donna Persaud

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Evaluate effects of a multicomponent intervention (human papillomavirus [HPV] vaccine-specific brochure and recalls) on HPV vaccination and secondarily examine if race/ethnicity moderates effects. METHODS: Unvaccinated girls aged 11 to 18 years attending 4 safety-net pediatric clinics and their parent/guardian (n = 814 dyads) were randomized to (1) active comparison (general adolescent vaccine brochure), or (2) intervention consisting of a HPV vaccine-specific brochure, telephone recalls to parents who declined, and recalls to patients overdue for doses 2 and 3. HPV 1-dose and 3-dose coverages were assessed via electronic health records 12 months after randomization. Multivariate logistic regressions estimated adjusted odds and marginal predicted vaccine coverage by study arm and race/ethnicity. RESULTS: Intent-to-treat analyses found no main effect of the HPV vaccine-specific brochure on 1-dose coverage (42.0% vs 40.6%); however, secondary analyses found race/ethnicity was a significant moderator such that the intervention was effective only for Hispanic individuals (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 1.43; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-2.02), and not effective for black individuals (AOR 0.64; 95% CI 0.41-1.13). Recalls to parents who declined the vaccine during the index visit were not effective, but recalls to patients overdue for doses 2 and 3 were effective at increasing 3-dose coverage regardless of race/ethnicity (AOR 1.99; 95% CI 1.16-3.45). CONCLUSIONS: Educational materials describing only the HPV vaccine were effective for Hispanic but not black individuals. Future research should test mechanisms that may mediate intervention effects for different racial/ethnic groups, such as different informational needs or vaccine schemas (experiences, beliefs, norms).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)850-859
Number of pages10
JournalPediatrics
Volume136
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2015

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Safety-net Providers
Papillomavirus Vaccines
Pamphlets
Vaccination
Vaccines
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Hispanic Americans
Parents
Electronic Health Records
Random Allocation
Ethnic Groups
Telephone
Logistic Models
Pediatrics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Promoting HPV vaccination in safety-net clinics : A randomized trial. / Tiro, Jasmin A.; Sanders, Joanne M.; Pruitt, Sandi L.; Stevens, Clare Frey; Skinner, Celette Sugg; Bishop, Wendy P.; Fuller, Sobha; Persaud, Donna.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 136, No. 5, 01.11.2015, p. 850-859.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tiro, JA, Sanders, JM, Pruitt, SL, Stevens, CF, Skinner, CS, Bishop, WP, Fuller, S & Persaud, D 2015, 'Promoting HPV vaccination in safety-net clinics: A randomized trial', Pediatrics, vol. 136, no. 5, pp. 850-859. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2015-1563
Tiro, Jasmin A. ; Sanders, Joanne M. ; Pruitt, Sandi L. ; Stevens, Clare Frey ; Skinner, Celette Sugg ; Bishop, Wendy P. ; Fuller, Sobha ; Persaud, Donna. / Promoting HPV vaccination in safety-net clinics : A randomized trial. In: Pediatrics. 2015 ; Vol. 136, No. 5. pp. 850-859.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVES: Evaluate effects of a multicomponent intervention (human papillomavirus [HPV] vaccine-specific brochure and recalls) on HPV vaccination and secondarily examine if race/ethnicity moderates effects. METHODS: Unvaccinated girls aged 11 to 18 years attending 4 safety-net pediatric clinics and their parent/guardian (n = 814 dyads) were randomized to (1) active comparison (general adolescent vaccine brochure), or (2) intervention consisting of a HPV vaccine-specific brochure, telephone recalls to parents who declined, and recalls to patients overdue for doses 2 and 3. HPV 1-dose and 3-dose coverages were assessed via electronic health records 12 months after randomization. Multivariate logistic regressions estimated adjusted odds and marginal predicted vaccine coverage by study arm and race/ethnicity. RESULTS: Intent-to-treat analyses found no main effect of the HPV vaccine-specific brochure on 1-dose coverage (42.0{\%} vs 40.6{\%}); however, secondary analyses found race/ethnicity was a significant moderator such that the intervention was effective only for Hispanic individuals (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 1.43; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI] 1.02-2.02), and not effective for black individuals (AOR 0.64; 95{\%} CI 0.41-1.13). Recalls to parents who declined the vaccine during the index visit were not effective, but recalls to patients overdue for doses 2 and 3 were effective at increasing 3-dose coverage regardless of race/ethnicity (AOR 1.99; 95{\%} CI 1.16-3.45). CONCLUSIONS: Educational materials describing only the HPV vaccine were effective for Hispanic but not black individuals. Future research should test mechanisms that may mediate intervention effects for different racial/ethnic groups, such as different informational needs or vaccine schemas (experiences, beliefs, norms).",
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N2 - OBJECTIVES: Evaluate effects of a multicomponent intervention (human papillomavirus [HPV] vaccine-specific brochure and recalls) on HPV vaccination and secondarily examine if race/ethnicity moderates effects. METHODS: Unvaccinated girls aged 11 to 18 years attending 4 safety-net pediatric clinics and their parent/guardian (n = 814 dyads) were randomized to (1) active comparison (general adolescent vaccine brochure), or (2) intervention consisting of a HPV vaccine-specific brochure, telephone recalls to parents who declined, and recalls to patients overdue for doses 2 and 3. HPV 1-dose and 3-dose coverages were assessed via electronic health records 12 months after randomization. Multivariate logistic regressions estimated adjusted odds and marginal predicted vaccine coverage by study arm and race/ethnicity. RESULTS: Intent-to-treat analyses found no main effect of the HPV vaccine-specific brochure on 1-dose coverage (42.0% vs 40.6%); however, secondary analyses found race/ethnicity was a significant moderator such that the intervention was effective only for Hispanic individuals (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 1.43; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-2.02), and not effective for black individuals (AOR 0.64; 95% CI 0.41-1.13). Recalls to parents who declined the vaccine during the index visit were not effective, but recalls to patients overdue for doses 2 and 3 were effective at increasing 3-dose coverage regardless of race/ethnicity (AOR 1.99; 95% CI 1.16-3.45). CONCLUSIONS: Educational materials describing only the HPV vaccine were effective for Hispanic but not black individuals. Future research should test mechanisms that may mediate intervention effects for different racial/ethnic groups, such as different informational needs or vaccine schemas (experiences, beliefs, norms).

AB - OBJECTIVES: Evaluate effects of a multicomponent intervention (human papillomavirus [HPV] vaccine-specific brochure and recalls) on HPV vaccination and secondarily examine if race/ethnicity moderates effects. METHODS: Unvaccinated girls aged 11 to 18 years attending 4 safety-net pediatric clinics and their parent/guardian (n = 814 dyads) were randomized to (1) active comparison (general adolescent vaccine brochure), or (2) intervention consisting of a HPV vaccine-specific brochure, telephone recalls to parents who declined, and recalls to patients overdue for doses 2 and 3. HPV 1-dose and 3-dose coverages were assessed via electronic health records 12 months after randomization. Multivariate logistic regressions estimated adjusted odds and marginal predicted vaccine coverage by study arm and race/ethnicity. RESULTS: Intent-to-treat analyses found no main effect of the HPV vaccine-specific brochure on 1-dose coverage (42.0% vs 40.6%); however, secondary analyses found race/ethnicity was a significant moderator such that the intervention was effective only for Hispanic individuals (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 1.43; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-2.02), and not effective for black individuals (AOR 0.64; 95% CI 0.41-1.13). Recalls to parents who declined the vaccine during the index visit were not effective, but recalls to patients overdue for doses 2 and 3 were effective at increasing 3-dose coverage regardless of race/ethnicity (AOR 1.99; 95% CI 1.16-3.45). CONCLUSIONS: Educational materials describing only the HPV vaccine were effective for Hispanic but not black individuals. Future research should test mechanisms that may mediate intervention effects for different racial/ethnic groups, such as different informational needs or vaccine schemas (experiences, beliefs, norms).

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