Protective effects of curcumin and photo-irradiated curcumin on circulatory lipids and lipid peroxidation products in alcohol and polyunsaturated fatty acid-induced toxicity

R. Rukkumani, M. Sri Balasubashini, Venugopal P. Menon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Scopus citations

Abstract

Alcohol is a neurotoxin associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Ethanol is found to induce a dose dependent increase in lipid peroxidation (LPO). The elevation in lipid peroxidative products and the loss of antioxidant defense potential are enhanced when alcohol is taken along with polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) or heated PUFA. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of curcumin and photo-irradiated curcumin on alcohol and PUFA induced LPO and lipid profiles in plasma. The levels of vitamin C and E were decreased significantly in alcohol + raw as well as heated PUFA groups. The treatment with curcumin and photo-irradiated curcumin (IC) increased their levels significantly. The increase was more significant in the IC group than the curcumin group. The levels of cholesterol, phospholipids (PL), triglycerides (TG), free fatty acids (FFA), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and hydroperoxides (HP) were increased significantly in alcohol + raw as well as heated PUFA groups and the treatment with curcumin and IC, brought back the levels. But the IC reduced the levels more significantly than curcumin. Thus, our results indicate that IC is a more potent antioxidant than curcumin.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)925-929
Number of pages5
JournalPhytotherapy Research
Volume17
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2003

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • Curcumin
  • Lipid peroxidation; circulatory lipids
  • PUFA
  • Photo-irradiated curcumin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

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