Protein-coated poly(L-lactic acid) fibers provide a substrate for differentiation of human skeletal muscle cells

Elizabeth M. Cronin, Frederick A. Thurmond, Rhonda Bassel-Duby, R. Sanders Williams, Woodring E. Wright, Kevin D. Nelson, Harold R. Garner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Tissue engineering represents a potential method for repairing damaged skeletal muscle tissue. Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins were evaluated for their ability to aid in cell attachment, whereas a poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) fiber scaffold was tested as a substrate for the differentiation of human skeletal muscle cells. In comparison to uncoated or gelatin-coated PLLA films, cell attachment increased significantly (p < 0.001) on PLLA films coated with ECM gel, fibronectin, or laminin. Myoblasts differentiated into multinucleated myofibers on ECM gel-coated PLLA fibers, and expressed muscle markers such as myosin and α-actinin. Oligonucleotide microarray analysis showed similar gene expression profiles for human skeletal muscle cells on ECM gel-coated PLLA fibers as to that observed for myofibers on tissue culture plates. Therefore, PLLA fibers coated with ECM proteins provide a scaffold for the development of skeletal muscle tissue for tissue engineering and cell transplantation applications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)373-381
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A
Volume69
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jun 1 2004

Fingerprint

Lactic acid
Muscle
Cells
Proteins
Fibers
Substrates
Gels
Extracellular Matrix Proteins
Tissue engineering
Scaffolds
Tissue
Transplantation (surgical)
Actinin
Tissue culture
Oligonucleotides
Bioelectric potentials
Laminin
Gelatin
Myosins
Scaffolds (biology)

Keywords

  • Differentiation
  • Extracellular matrix proteins
  • Poly L-lactic acid fiber scaffold
  • Skeletal muscle
  • Tissue engineering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Biomaterials

Cite this

Protein-coated poly(L-lactic acid) fibers provide a substrate for differentiation of human skeletal muscle cells. / Cronin, Elizabeth M.; Thurmond, Frederick A.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Williams, R. Sanders; Wright, Woodring E.; Nelson, Kevin D.; Garner, Harold R.

In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A, Vol. 69, No. 3, 01.06.2004, p. 373-381.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cronin, Elizabeth M. ; Thurmond, Frederick A. ; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda ; Williams, R. Sanders ; Wright, Woodring E. ; Nelson, Kevin D. ; Garner, Harold R. / Protein-coated poly(L-lactic acid) fibers provide a substrate for differentiation of human skeletal muscle cells. In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A. 2004 ; Vol. 69, No. 3. pp. 373-381.
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