Proteobacteria-specific IgA regulates maturation of the intestinal microbiota

Julie Mirpuri, Megan Raetz, Carolyn R. Sturge, Cara L. Wilhelm, Alicia Benson, Rashmin C. Savani, Lora V. Hooper, Felix Yarovinsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

73 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The intestinal microbiota changes dynamically from birth to adulthood. In this study we identified γ-Proteobacteria as a dominant phylum present in newborn mice that is suppressed in normal adult microbiota. The transition from a neonatal to a mature microbiota was in part regulated by induction of a γ-Proteobacteria-specific IgA response. Neocolonization experiments in germ-free mice further revealed a dominant Proteobacteria-specific IgA response triggered by the immature microbiota. Finally, a role for B cells in the regulation of microbiota maturation was confirmed in IgA-deficient mice. Mice lacking IgA had persistent intestinal colonization with γ-Proteobacteria that resulted in sustained intestinal inflammation and increased susceptibility to neonatal and adult models of intestinal injury. Collectively, these results identify an IgA-dependent mechanism responsible for the maturation of the intestinal microbiota.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)28-39
Number of pages12
JournalGut Microbes
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Proteobacteria
Immunoglobulin A
Microbiota
B-Lymphocytes
Gastrointestinal Microbiome
Parturition
Inflammation
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • colitis
  • IgA
  • microbiota
  • necrotizing enterocolitis
  • proteobacteria

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Mirpuri, J., Raetz, M., Sturge, C. R., Wilhelm, C. L., Benson, A., Savani, R. C., ... Yarovinsky, F. (2014). Proteobacteria-specific IgA regulates maturation of the intestinal microbiota. Gut Microbes, 5(1), 28-39. https://doi.org/10.4161/gmic.26489

Proteobacteria-specific IgA regulates maturation of the intestinal microbiota. / Mirpuri, Julie; Raetz, Megan; Sturge, Carolyn R.; Wilhelm, Cara L.; Benson, Alicia; Savani, Rashmin C.; Hooper, Lora V.; Yarovinsky, Felix.

In: Gut Microbes, Vol. 5, No. 1, 01.01.2014, p. 28-39.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mirpuri, Julie ; Raetz, Megan ; Sturge, Carolyn R. ; Wilhelm, Cara L. ; Benson, Alicia ; Savani, Rashmin C. ; Hooper, Lora V. ; Yarovinsky, Felix. / Proteobacteria-specific IgA regulates maturation of the intestinal microbiota. In: Gut Microbes. 2014 ; Vol. 5, No. 1. pp. 28-39.
@article{de5b128cf48f49d39bff54e5b1cc7c86,
title = "Proteobacteria-specific IgA regulates maturation of the intestinal microbiota",
abstract = "The intestinal microbiota changes dynamically from birth to adulthood. In this study we identified γ-Proteobacteria as a dominant phylum present in newborn mice that is suppressed in normal adult microbiota. The transition from a neonatal to a mature microbiota was in part regulated by induction of a γ-Proteobacteria-specific IgA response. Neocolonization experiments in germ-free mice further revealed a dominant Proteobacteria-specific IgA response triggered by the immature microbiota. Finally, a role for B cells in the regulation of microbiota maturation was confirmed in IgA-deficient mice. Mice lacking IgA had persistent intestinal colonization with γ-Proteobacteria that resulted in sustained intestinal inflammation and increased susceptibility to neonatal and adult models of intestinal injury. Collectively, these results identify an IgA-dependent mechanism responsible for the maturation of the intestinal microbiota.",
keywords = "colitis, IgA, microbiota, necrotizing enterocolitis, proteobacteria",
author = "Julie Mirpuri and Megan Raetz and Sturge, {Carolyn R.} and Wilhelm, {Cara L.} and Alicia Benson and Savani, {Rashmin C.} and Hooper, {Lora V.} and Felix Yarovinsky",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.4161/gmic.26489",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "5",
pages = "28--39",
journal = "Gut Microbes",
issn = "1949-0976",
publisher = "Landes Bioscience",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Proteobacteria-specific IgA regulates maturation of the intestinal microbiota

AU - Mirpuri, Julie

AU - Raetz, Megan

AU - Sturge, Carolyn R.

AU - Wilhelm, Cara L.

AU - Benson, Alicia

AU - Savani, Rashmin C.

AU - Hooper, Lora V.

AU - Yarovinsky, Felix

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - The intestinal microbiota changes dynamically from birth to adulthood. In this study we identified γ-Proteobacteria as a dominant phylum present in newborn mice that is suppressed in normal adult microbiota. The transition from a neonatal to a mature microbiota was in part regulated by induction of a γ-Proteobacteria-specific IgA response. Neocolonization experiments in germ-free mice further revealed a dominant Proteobacteria-specific IgA response triggered by the immature microbiota. Finally, a role for B cells in the regulation of microbiota maturation was confirmed in IgA-deficient mice. Mice lacking IgA had persistent intestinal colonization with γ-Proteobacteria that resulted in sustained intestinal inflammation and increased susceptibility to neonatal and adult models of intestinal injury. Collectively, these results identify an IgA-dependent mechanism responsible for the maturation of the intestinal microbiota.

AB - The intestinal microbiota changes dynamically from birth to adulthood. In this study we identified γ-Proteobacteria as a dominant phylum present in newborn mice that is suppressed in normal adult microbiota. The transition from a neonatal to a mature microbiota was in part regulated by induction of a γ-Proteobacteria-specific IgA response. Neocolonization experiments in germ-free mice further revealed a dominant Proteobacteria-specific IgA response triggered by the immature microbiota. Finally, a role for B cells in the regulation of microbiota maturation was confirmed in IgA-deficient mice. Mice lacking IgA had persistent intestinal colonization with γ-Proteobacteria that resulted in sustained intestinal inflammation and increased susceptibility to neonatal and adult models of intestinal injury. Collectively, these results identify an IgA-dependent mechanism responsible for the maturation of the intestinal microbiota.

KW - colitis

KW - IgA

KW - microbiota

KW - necrotizing enterocolitis

KW - proteobacteria

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84920563522&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84920563522&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.4161/gmic.26489

DO - 10.4161/gmic.26489

M3 - Article

C2 - 24637807

AN - SCOPUS:84900549422

VL - 5

SP - 28

EP - 39

JO - Gut Microbes

JF - Gut Microbes

SN - 1949-0976

IS - 1

ER -