Protocol paper: Stepped wedge cluster randomized trial translating the ABCS into optimizing cardiovascular care for people living with HIV

Stephen K. Williams, Brent A. Johnson, Jonathan N. Tobin, Amneris Esther Luque, Mechelle Sanders, Jennifer K. Carroll, Andrea Cassells, Tameir Holder, Kevin Fiscella

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

People living with HIV (PWH) are at higher risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and stroke in comparison to their non-infected counterparts. The ABCS (aspirin-blood pressure control-cholesterol control-smoking cessation) reduce atherosclerotic (ASCVD) risk in the general population, but little is known regarding strategies for promoting the ABCS among PWH. Guided by the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR), we designed multilevel implementation strategies that target PWH and their clinicians to promote appropriate use of the ABCS based on a 10-year estimated ASCVD risk. Implementation strategies include patient coaching, automated texting, peer phone support, academic detailing and audit and feedback for the patient's clinician. We are evaluating implementation through a stepped wedge cluster randomized trial based on the Reach-Effectiveness-Adoption-Maintenance/Qualitative-Evaluation-for-Systematic-Translation (RE-AIM/QuEST) mixed methods framework that integrates quantitative and qualitative assessments. The primary outcome is change in ASCVD risk. Findings will have important implications regarding strategies for reducing ASCVD risk among PWH.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)125-133
Number of pages9
JournalProgress in Cardiovascular Diseases
Volume63
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2020

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular disease
  • HIV
  • Implementation effectiveness
  • Primary prevention
  • Risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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