Provision of cholesterol to lymphocytes by high density and low density lipoproteins. Requirement for low density lipoprotein receptors.

J. A. Cuthbert, P. E. Lipsky

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Abstract

The capacity of lipoprotein fractions to provide cholesterol necessary for human lymphocyte proliferation was examined. When endogenous synthesis of cholesterol was blocked, proliferation of mitogen-stimulated normal human lymphocytes was markedly inhibited unless an exogenous source of sterol was supplied. All lipoprotein fractions with the exception of high density lipoprotein subclass 3 were able to provide cholesterol for lymphocyte proliferation. Each of the lipoprotein subfractions capable of providing cholesterol was also able to regulate endogenous sterol synthesis in cultured human lymphocytes. Provision of cholesterol by lipoproteins required the interaction of apolipoprotein B or apolipoprotein E with specific receptors on normal lymphocytes. Apolipoprotein modification by acetylation or methylation, which markedly reduced the ability to regulate sterol biosynthesis, also diminished the capacity of lipoproteins to provide cholesterol. In addition, depletion of apolipoprotein B- and apolipoprotein E-containing particles from high density lipoprotein decreased its ability to suppress cholesterol synthesis and prevented it from providing cholesterol to proliferating lymphocytes. Monoclonal antibodies directed against the receptor-recognition sites on apolipoprotein B and apolipoprotein E were used to define the specific apolipoproteins required for the provision of cholesterol to lymphocytes by the various lipoprotein fractions. The antibody to apolipoprotein B inhibited cholesterol provision by both low density lipoprotein (LDL) and other lipoprotein fractions. The antibody to apolipoprotein E did not decrease provision of cholesterol by LDL but did inhibit the capacity of other fractions to provide cholesterol. In addition, a monoclonal antibody against the ligand binding site on the LDL receptor inhibited provision of cholesterol to normal lymphocytes by all lipoproteins. Finally, lymphocytes lacking LDL receptors were unable to obtain cholesterol from any lipoprotein fraction. These studies demonstrate that LDL receptor-mediated interaction with apolipoprotein B or apolipoprotein E is essential for the provision of cholesterol to normal human lymphocytes from all lipoprotein sources.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)7808-7818
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume262
Issue number16
StatePublished - Jun 5 1987

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Lymphocytes
LDL Receptors
LDL Lipoproteins
Cholesterol
Lipoproteins
Apolipoproteins B
Apolipoproteins E
Sterols
Apolipoproteins
Monoclonal Antibodies
HDL3 Lipoprotein
Acetylation
Antibodies
Methylation
HDL Lipoproteins
Biosynthesis
Mitogens
LDL Cholesterol
Binding Sites

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

Cite this

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title = "Provision of cholesterol to lymphocytes by high density and low density lipoproteins. Requirement for low density lipoprotein receptors.",
abstract = "The capacity of lipoprotein fractions to provide cholesterol necessary for human lymphocyte proliferation was examined. When endogenous synthesis of cholesterol was blocked, proliferation of mitogen-stimulated normal human lymphocytes was markedly inhibited unless an exogenous source of sterol was supplied. All lipoprotein fractions with the exception of high density lipoprotein subclass 3 were able to provide cholesterol for lymphocyte proliferation. Each of the lipoprotein subfractions capable of providing cholesterol was also able to regulate endogenous sterol synthesis in cultured human lymphocytes. Provision of cholesterol by lipoproteins required the interaction of apolipoprotein B or apolipoprotein E with specific receptors on normal lymphocytes. Apolipoprotein modification by acetylation or methylation, which markedly reduced the ability to regulate sterol biosynthesis, also diminished the capacity of lipoproteins to provide cholesterol. In addition, depletion of apolipoprotein B- and apolipoprotein E-containing particles from high density lipoprotein decreased its ability to suppress cholesterol synthesis and prevented it from providing cholesterol to proliferating lymphocytes. Monoclonal antibodies directed against the receptor-recognition sites on apolipoprotein B and apolipoprotein E were used to define the specific apolipoproteins required for the provision of cholesterol to lymphocytes by the various lipoprotein fractions. The antibody to apolipoprotein B inhibited cholesterol provision by both low density lipoprotein (LDL) and other lipoprotein fractions. The antibody to apolipoprotein E did not decrease provision of cholesterol by LDL but did inhibit the capacity of other fractions to provide cholesterol. In addition, a monoclonal antibody against the ligand binding site on the LDL receptor inhibited provision of cholesterol to normal lymphocytes by all lipoproteins. Finally, lymphocytes lacking LDL receptors were unable to obtain cholesterol from any lipoprotein fraction. These studies demonstrate that LDL receptor-mediated interaction with apolipoprotein B or apolipoprotein E is essential for the provision of cholesterol to normal human lymphocytes from all lipoprotein sources.",
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T1 - Provision of cholesterol to lymphocytes by high density and low density lipoproteins. Requirement for low density lipoprotein receptors.

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AU - Lipsky, P. E.

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N2 - The capacity of lipoprotein fractions to provide cholesterol necessary for human lymphocyte proliferation was examined. When endogenous synthesis of cholesterol was blocked, proliferation of mitogen-stimulated normal human lymphocytes was markedly inhibited unless an exogenous source of sterol was supplied. All lipoprotein fractions with the exception of high density lipoprotein subclass 3 were able to provide cholesterol for lymphocyte proliferation. Each of the lipoprotein subfractions capable of providing cholesterol was also able to regulate endogenous sterol synthesis in cultured human lymphocytes. Provision of cholesterol by lipoproteins required the interaction of apolipoprotein B or apolipoprotein E with specific receptors on normal lymphocytes. Apolipoprotein modification by acetylation or methylation, which markedly reduced the ability to regulate sterol biosynthesis, also diminished the capacity of lipoproteins to provide cholesterol. In addition, depletion of apolipoprotein B- and apolipoprotein E-containing particles from high density lipoprotein decreased its ability to suppress cholesterol synthesis and prevented it from providing cholesterol to proliferating lymphocytes. Monoclonal antibodies directed against the receptor-recognition sites on apolipoprotein B and apolipoprotein E were used to define the specific apolipoproteins required for the provision of cholesterol to lymphocytes by the various lipoprotein fractions. The antibody to apolipoprotein B inhibited cholesterol provision by both low density lipoprotein (LDL) and other lipoprotein fractions. The antibody to apolipoprotein E did not decrease provision of cholesterol by LDL but did inhibit the capacity of other fractions to provide cholesterol. In addition, a monoclonal antibody against the ligand binding site on the LDL receptor inhibited provision of cholesterol to normal lymphocytes by all lipoproteins. Finally, lymphocytes lacking LDL receptors were unable to obtain cholesterol from any lipoprotein fraction. These studies demonstrate that LDL receptor-mediated interaction with apolipoprotein B or apolipoprotein E is essential for the provision of cholesterol to normal human lymphocytes from all lipoprotein sources.

AB - The capacity of lipoprotein fractions to provide cholesterol necessary for human lymphocyte proliferation was examined. When endogenous synthesis of cholesterol was blocked, proliferation of mitogen-stimulated normal human lymphocytes was markedly inhibited unless an exogenous source of sterol was supplied. All lipoprotein fractions with the exception of high density lipoprotein subclass 3 were able to provide cholesterol for lymphocyte proliferation. Each of the lipoprotein subfractions capable of providing cholesterol was also able to regulate endogenous sterol synthesis in cultured human lymphocytes. Provision of cholesterol by lipoproteins required the interaction of apolipoprotein B or apolipoprotein E with specific receptors on normal lymphocytes. Apolipoprotein modification by acetylation or methylation, which markedly reduced the ability to regulate sterol biosynthesis, also diminished the capacity of lipoproteins to provide cholesterol. In addition, depletion of apolipoprotein B- and apolipoprotein E-containing particles from high density lipoprotein decreased its ability to suppress cholesterol synthesis and prevented it from providing cholesterol to proliferating lymphocytes. Monoclonal antibodies directed against the receptor-recognition sites on apolipoprotein B and apolipoprotein E were used to define the specific apolipoproteins required for the provision of cholesterol to lymphocytes by the various lipoprotein fractions. The antibody to apolipoprotein B inhibited cholesterol provision by both low density lipoprotein (LDL) and other lipoprotein fractions. The antibody to apolipoprotein E did not decrease provision of cholesterol by LDL but did inhibit the capacity of other fractions to provide cholesterol. In addition, a monoclonal antibody against the ligand binding site on the LDL receptor inhibited provision of cholesterol to normal lymphocytes by all lipoproteins. Finally, lymphocytes lacking LDL receptors were unable to obtain cholesterol from any lipoprotein fraction. These studies demonstrate that LDL receptor-mediated interaction with apolipoprotein B or apolipoprotein E is essential for the provision of cholesterol to normal human lymphocytes from all lipoprotein sources.

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