Proximity of the neurovascular structures during all-inside lateral meniscal repair in children: a cadaveric study

Yi Meng Yen, Peter D. Fabricant, Connor G. Richmond, Aleksei B. Dingel, Matthew D. Milewski, Henry B Ellis, Philip L Wilson, Stephanie W. Mayer, Theodore J. Ganley, Kevin G. Shea

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Abstract

Purpose: Meniscal repair has become increasingly common in a pediatric and adolescent population. All-inside repair techniques are utilized more often given their ease of insertion and decreased operative time required. However, there are possible risks including damage to adjacent neurovascular structures. The purpose of this study to was examine the proximity of the neurovascular structures during lateral meniscus repairs in pediatric specimens simulating a worst-case scenario. Methods: Ten pediatric cadaveric knees (age 4–11) were utilized and simulated lateral meniscal repair through the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus and both medial and lateral to the popliteal hiatus through the body of the lateral meniscus was performed with an all-inside meniscal repair device. The distance to the popliteal artery or peroneal nerve was measured. Results: During posterior horn repair, the average distance from the all-inside device to the popliteal artery was 1.9 mm ± 1.1 mm. There was penetration of the artery in one specimen. During repair on the medial side of popliteal hiatus, the average distance from the all-inside device to the peroneal nerve was 3.2 mm ± 2.0 mm. During repair on the lateral side of popliteal hiatus, the average distance from the all-inside device to the peroneal nerve was 12.4 mm ± 3.7 mm. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that the proximity of the neurovascular structures to the lateral meniscus in children is extremely close and at high risk during meniscal repair with all-inside devices. This study gives important data for the proximity of these structures during these repair techniques. Level of evidence: Level 5 Cadaveric Study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number50
JournalJournal of Experimental Orthopaedics
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2018

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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