Psychomotor retardation in depression: Biological underpinnings, measurement, and treatment

Jeylan S. Buyukdura, Shawn M. McClintock, Paul E. Croarkin

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

130 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Psychomotor retardation is a long established component of depression that can have significant clinical and therapeutic implications for treatment. Due to its negative impact on overall function in depressed patients, we review its biological correlates, optimal methods of measurement, and relevance in the context of therapeutic interventions. The aim of the paper is to provide a synthesis of the literature on psychomotor retardation in depression with the goal of enhanced awareness for clinicians and researchers. Increased knowledge and understanding of psychomotor retardation in major depressive disorder may lead to further research and better informed diagnosis in regards to psychomotor retardation. Manifestations of psychomotor retardation include slowed speech, decreased movement, and impaired cognitive function. It is common in patients with melancholic depression and those with psychotic features. Biological correlates may include abnormalities in the basal ganglia and dopaminergic pathways. Neurophysiologic tools such as neuroimaging and transcranial magnetic stimulation may play a role in the study of this symptom in the future. At present, there are three objective scales to evaluate psychomotor retardation severity. Studies examining the impact of psychomotor retardation on clinical outcome have found differential results. However, available evidence suggests that depressed patients with psychomotor retardation may respond well to electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Current literature regarding antidepressants is inconclusive, though tricyclic antidepressants may be considered for treatment of patients with psychomotor retardation. Future work examining this objective aspect of major depressive disorder (MDD) is essential. This could further elucidate the biological underpinnings of depression and optimize its treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)395-409
Number of pages15
JournalProgress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry
Volume35
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 30 2011

Fingerprint

Depression
Major Depressive Disorder
Therapeutics
Electroconvulsive Therapy
Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
Tricyclic Antidepressive Agents
Basal Ganglia
Neuroimaging
Cognition
Antidepressive Agents
Research Personnel
Research

Keywords

  • Major depressive disorder
  • Neuropsychological measures
  • Psychomotor retardation
  • Rating scales

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Biological Psychiatry

Cite this

Psychomotor retardation in depression : Biological underpinnings, measurement, and treatment. / Buyukdura, Jeylan S.; McClintock, Shawn M.; Croarkin, Paul E.

In: Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry, Vol. 35, No. 2, 30.03.2011, p. 395-409.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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