Race as a predictor of postoperative hospital readmission after spine surgery

Joel R. Martin, Timothy Y. Wang, Daniel Loriaux, Rupen Desai, Maragatha Kuchibhatla, Isaac O. Karikari, Carlos A. Bagley, Oren N. Gottfried

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hospital readmission after surgery results in a substantial economic burden, and several recent studies have investigated the impact of race and ethnicity on hospital readmission rates, with the goal to identify hospitals and patients with high readmission risk. This single-institution, retrospective cohort study assesses the impact of race, along with other risk factors, on 30-day readmission rates following spinal surgery. This study is a single-institution retrospective cohort study with accrual from January 1, 2008, to December 31, 2010. Inclusion criteria included adult patients who underwent anterior and/or posterior spinal surgery. The primary aim of this study was to assess the impact of patient race and other risk factors for postoperative hospital readmission within 30 days following spine surgery. A total of 1346 patients (654 male, 692 female) were included in the study. Overall, 159 patients (11.8%) were readmitted in the 30 days following their surgery. Multivariate logistic regression found significant risk factors for 30-day readmission, including Black race (OR: 2.20, C.I. 95% (1.04, 4.64)) and total length of stay greater than 7 days (OR: 4.73, C.I. 95% (1.72, 12.98)). Cervical surgery was associated with decreased odds of readmission (OR: 0.27, C.I. 95% (0.08, 0.91)). Our study demonstrates that race and length of hospital stay influence the incidence of 30-day readmission rates after spinal surgery. Studies such as ours will aid in identifying patients with postoperative readmission risk and help elucidate the underlying factors that may be contributing to disparities in readmission after surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)21-25
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Neuroscience
Volume46
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

Fingerprint

Patient Readmission
Spine
Length of Stay
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies
Logistic Models
Economics
Incidence

Keywords

  • Health expenditures
  • Health status disparities
  • Hospital readmission
  • Outcomes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Martin, J. R., Wang, T. Y., Loriaux, D., Desai, R., Kuchibhatla, M., Karikari, I. O., ... Gottfried, O. N. (2017). Race as a predictor of postoperative hospital readmission after spine surgery. Journal of Clinical Neuroscience, 46, 21-25. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jocn.2017.08.015

Race as a predictor of postoperative hospital readmission after spine surgery. / Martin, Joel R.; Wang, Timothy Y.; Loriaux, Daniel; Desai, Rupen; Kuchibhatla, Maragatha; Karikari, Isaac O.; Bagley, Carlos A.; Gottfried, Oren N.

In: Journal of Clinical Neuroscience, Vol. 46, 01.12.2017, p. 21-25.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Martin, JR, Wang, TY, Loriaux, D, Desai, R, Kuchibhatla, M, Karikari, IO, Bagley, CA & Gottfried, ON 2017, 'Race as a predictor of postoperative hospital readmission after spine surgery', Journal of Clinical Neuroscience, vol. 46, pp. 21-25. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jocn.2017.08.015
Martin, Joel R. ; Wang, Timothy Y. ; Loriaux, Daniel ; Desai, Rupen ; Kuchibhatla, Maragatha ; Karikari, Isaac O. ; Bagley, Carlos A. ; Gottfried, Oren N. / Race as a predictor of postoperative hospital readmission after spine surgery. In: Journal of Clinical Neuroscience. 2017 ; Vol. 46. pp. 21-25.
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