Racial and educational differences in mammography-related perceptions among 1,336 nonadherent women

Celette Sugg Skinner, Victoria Champion, Usha Menon, Roopa Seshadri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article identifies differences in mammography-related perceptions between African Americans and Caucasians of differing educational levels and racial differences in beliefs across stages of adoption of mammography among 1,336 women (mean age, 66 years; 55% African American). African Americans perceived stronger benefits of and lower barriers to mammography and greater self-efficacy regarding mammography than Caucasians did but had less knowledge about breast cancer and stronger cancer fatalism. Within races, the less well-educated women displayed less knowledge and more fatalism. Of seven perceptions, five differed by stage of adopting mammography among Caucasians and three differed by stage among African Americans. For both races, precontemplators had the lowest self-efficacy and knowledge and the highest barriers. However, whereas Caucasian precontemplators perceived the lowest benefits, African-American precontemplators had the highest benefit scores.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-18
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Psychosocial Oncology
Volume20
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

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Mammography
African Americans
Self Efficacy
Breast Neoplasms
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Breast cancer screening
  • Mammography
  • Race
  • Stage of change

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Oncology
  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Racial and educational differences in mammography-related perceptions among 1,336 nonadherent women. / Skinner, Celette Sugg; Champion, Victoria; Menon, Usha; Seshadri, Roopa.

In: Journal of Psychosocial Oncology, Vol. 20, No. 3, 2002, p. 1-18.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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