Racial and Ethnic Differences in the Prevalence of Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection

Karen B. Fowler, Shannon A. Ross, Masako Shimamura, Amina Ahmed, April L. Palmer, Marian G. Michaels, David I. Bernstein, Pablo J. Sánchez, Kristina N. Feja, Audra Stewart, Suresh Boppana

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

32 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the impact of race and ethnicity upon the prevalence and clinical spectrum of congenital cytomegalovirus infection (cCMV). Study design: From 2007 to 2012, 100 332 infants from 7 medical centers were screened for cCMV while in the hospital. Ethnicity and race were collected and cCMV prevalence rates were calculated. Results: The overall prevalence of cCMV in the cohort was 4.5 per 1000 live births (95% CI, 4.1-4.9). Black infants had the highest cCMV prevalence (9.5 per 1000 live births; 95% CI, 8.3-11.0), followed by multiracial infants (7.8 per 1000 live births; 95% CI, 4.7-12.0). Significantly lower prevalence rates were observed in non-Hispanic white infants (2.7 per 1000 live births; 95% CI, 2.2-3.3), Hispanic white infants (3.0 per 1000 live births; 95% CI, 2.4-3.6), and Asian infants (1.0 per 1000 live births; 95% CI, 0.3-2.5). After adjusting for socioeconomic status and maternal age, black infants were significantly more likely to have cCMV compared with non-Hispanic white infants (adjusted prevalence OR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.4-2.5). Hispanic white infants had a slightly lower risk of having cCMV compared with non-Hispanic white infants (adjusted prevalence OR, 0.7; 95% CI, 0.5-1.0). However, no significant differences in symptomatic cCMV (9.6%) and sensorineural hearing loss (7.8%) were observed between the race/ethnic groups. Conclusions: Significant racial and ethnic differences exist in the prevalence of cCMV, even after adjusting for socioeconomic status and maternal age. Although once infected, the newborn disease and rates of hearing loss in infants are similar with respect to race and ethnicity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)196-201.e1
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume200
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2018

Keywords

  • congenital cytomegalovirus infection
  • racial disparities
  • sensorineural hearing loss

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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