Racial/ethnic disparities and survival characteristics in non-pancreatic gastrointestinal tract neuroendocrine tumors

Suleyman Yasin Goksu, Muhammet Ozer, Muhammad S Beg, Nina Niu Sanford, Chul Ahn, Benjamin D. Fangman, Busra B. Goksu, Udit Verma, Aravind Sanjeevaiah, David Hsiehchen, Amy L. Jones, Radhika Kainthla, Syed M. Kazmi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: We studied the effect of race and ethnicity on disease characteristics and survival in gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors. Methods: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database was used to select patients with non-pancreatic gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors diagnosed between 2004 and 2015. Trends in survival were evaluated among three groups: Hispanic, non-Hispanic White, and non-Hispanic Black. Kaplan–Meier and Cox regression methods were performed to calculate overall survival and cause-specific survival after adjusting for patient and tumor characteristics. Results: A total of 26,399 patients were included in the study: 65.1% were non-Hispanic White, 19.9% were non-Hispanic Black, and 15% were Hispanic. Non-Hispanic White patients were more likely to be male (50.0%, p < 0.001), older than 60 years (48.0%, p < 0.001), and present with metastatic disease (17.7%, p < 0.001). Non-Hispanic White patients had small intestine neuroendocrine tumors, while Hispanic and non-Hispanic Black patients had rectum neuroendocrine tumors as the most common primary site. Hispanic patients had better overall survival, while non-Hispanic Black patients had better cause-specific survival versus non-Hispanic White patients. This finding was confirmed on multivariable analysis where Hispanic patients had improved overall survival compared to non-Hispanic White patients (Hazard ratio (HR): 0.89 (0.81–0.97)), whereas non-Hispanic Black patients had better cause-specific survival compared to non-Hispanic White patients (HR: 0.89 (0.80–0.98)). Conclusions: Race/ethnicity is an independent prognostic factor in patients with gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number2990
Pages (from-to)1-13
Number of pages13
JournalCancers
Volume12
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2020

Keywords

  • Database
  • Gastrointestinal tract
  • Neuroendocrine tumors
  • Race factors
  • Survival analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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