Racial/ethnic disparities and survival characteristics in non-pancreatic gastrointestinal tract neuroendocrine tumors

Suleyman Yasin Goksu, Muhammet Ozer, Muhammad S. Beg, Nina Niu Sanford, Chul Ahn, Benjamin D. Fangman, Busra B. Goksu, Udit Verma, Aravind Sanjeevaiah, David Hsiehchen, Amy L. Jones, Radhika Kainthla, Syed M. Kazmi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: We studied the effect of race and ethnicity on disease characteristics and survival in gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors. Methods: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database was used to select patients with non-pancreatic gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors diagnosed between 2004 and 2015. Trends in survival were evaluated among three groups: Hispanic, non-Hispanic White, and non-Hispanic Black. Kaplan–Meier and Cox regression methods were performed to calculate overall survival and cause-specific survival after adjusting for patient and tumor characteristics. Results: A total of 26,399 patients were included in the study: 65.1% were non-Hispanic White, 19.9% were non-Hispanic Black, and 15% were Hispanic. Non-Hispanic White patients were more likely to be male (50.0%, p < 0.001), older than 60 years (48.0%, p < 0.001), and present with metastatic disease (17.7%, p < 0.001). Non-Hispanic White patients had small intestine neuroendocrine tumors, while Hispanic and non-Hispanic Black patients had rectum neuroendocrine tumors as the most common primary site. Hispanic patients had better overall survival, while non-Hispanic Black patients had better cause-specific survival versus non-Hispanic White patients. This finding was confirmed on multivariable analysis where Hispanic patients had improved overall survival compared to non-Hispanic White patients (Hazard ratio (HR): 0.89 (0.81–0.97)), whereas non-Hispanic Black patients had better cause-specific survival compared to non-Hispanic White patients (HR: 0.89 (0.80–0.98)). Conclusions: Race/ethnicity is an independent prognostic factor in patients with gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number2990
Pages (from-to)1-13
Number of pages13
JournalCancers
Volume12
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2020

Keywords

  • Database
  • Gastrointestinal tract
  • Neuroendocrine tumors
  • Race factors
  • Survival analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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