Randomized controlled trial of intralesional corticosteroid and griseofulvin vs. griseofulvin alone for treatment of kerion

C. M. Ginsburg, V. N. Gan, M. Petruska

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We studied 30 children with tinea capitis and kerion to define the epidemiology of the disease and to compare the efficacy of intralesional steroid injection and griseofulvin to griseofulvin alone for treatment of this disorder. Patients ranged in age from 1 year to 12 years, 1 months (mean, 5 years, 7 months). All patients were black and 23 (77%) were female. (The racial composition of our clinic population is 45% black, 18% Latin American, 34% Caucasian and 3% Asian). Fungus cultures were positive in all but one patient and Trichophyton tonsurans was isolated from 26 of 30 (87%) of the pretreatment hair cultures. Direct microscopic examinations of KOH-treated hair samples were negative in 13 of 29 (43%) culture-positive patients. Patients were randomly assigned to receive intralesional steroid injection (2.5 mg) and griseofulvin (14 patients) or griseofulvin only (16 patients). The treatment groups were comparable with regard to age, sex, duration of lesions before treatment and type of lesions. There were no significant differences between the two treatment groups in the time to negative culture, time of onset of new hair growth, complete regrowth of hair and time to scalp clearing. We conclude that intralesional injection of corticosteroid is an unnecesary adjunct to therapy for patients with tinea capitis with kerion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1084-1087
Number of pages4
JournalPediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Volume6
Issue number12
StatePublished - 1987

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Griseofulvin
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Randomized Controlled Trials
Intralesional Injections
Hair
Tinea Capitis
Therapeutics
Steroids
Trichophyton
Scalp
Epidemiology
Fungi

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Randomized controlled trial of intralesional corticosteroid and griseofulvin vs. griseofulvin alone for treatment of kerion. / Ginsburg, C. M.; Gan, V. N.; Petruska, M.

In: Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, Vol. 6, No. 12, 1987, p. 1084-1087.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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