Randomized controlled trial on the impact of music therapy during cardiac catheterization on reactive hyperemia index and patient satisfaction: The functional change in endothelium after cardiac catheterization, with and without music therapy (FEAT) study

Lindsay Ripley, Georgios Christopoulos, Tesfaldet T. Michael, Mohammed Alomar, Bavana V. Rangan, Michele Roesle, Anna Kotsia, Subhash Banerjee, Emmanouil S. Brilakis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To determine the impact of music intervention on endothelial function, hemodynamics, and patient anxiety before, during, and after cardiac catheterization. BACKGROUND: The effect of music therapy during cardiac catheterization on endothelial function and patient satisfaction has received limited study. METHODS: Seventy patients undergoing elective cardiac catheterization were randomized to music therapy (n≤36) or no music therapy (n≤34). Peripheral arterial tonometry was performed before and after catheterization. A 6 item (24-point scale) questionnaire evaluating patient anxiety and discomfort levels was also administered after the procedure. RESULTS: Both study groups had similar baseline characteristics, fluoroscopy time, and contrast administration. Reactive hyperemia index (RHI) change was 0.14 ± 0.72 in the music group and 0.30 ± 0.58 in the control group (P≤.35). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) changes did not significantly differ between the two groups (systolic BP change -3.3 ± 17.3 mm Hg vs -2.3 ± 19.4 mm Hg; P≤.83 and diastolic BP change -1.9 ± 12.2 mm Hg vs. 2.0 ± 13.4 mm Hg; P≤.23). Heart rate changes were also comparable between the two groups (-1 ± 6 beats/ min vs -1 ± 7 beats/min; P≤.22). Patient satisfaction questionnaire measurements were found to be similar in patients with and without music therapy (8 [7-11] vs 9 [8-12]; P≤.36). CONCLUSIONS: In this study, music intervention did not elicit a vasodilator response, did not lower blood pressure or heart rate, and did not relieve anxiety or stress discomfort in patients who underwent coronary angiography.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)437-442
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Invasive Cardiology
Volume26
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 1 2014

Keywords

  • anxiety
  • cardiac catheterization
  • endothelial function
  • hemodynamics
  • music
  • stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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