Rapid decrease of insulin specific IgG antibody levels in insulin-dependent patients transferred to semi-synthetic human insulin

Philip Raskin, D. D. Etzwiler, J. K. Davidson, M. Nolte, J. W. Stephens, M. MacGillivray, A. A. Lauritano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

A multicenter, open trial was designed to examine the efficacy and safety of semi-synthetic human insulin (SSHI; Novolin R and Novolin L, Squibb-Novo) in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus who were transferred from other commercially-available insulins. Whether such a change in therapy would reduce circulating IgG antibodies to antibovine insulin was also evaluated. A total of 68 males and females, 8-62 yr of age, were maintained on their original insulin therapy for 4 weeks, when both glycosylated hemoglobin and fasting blood glucose were assessed. IgG antibody titers to antibovine insulin were also measured. All patients were then transferred to SSHI for a period of 20 weeks. The same variables were evaluated at Weeks 2, 4, 8 and 20. Mean fasting blood glucose levels rose monotonically from 189-226.3 mg/dl over the course of the 20-week clinical trial. There was a slight but insignificant increase in glycosylated hemoglobin by the end of the test period. The average value for antibovine insulin IgG antibodies decreased from 2.54 mu/ml at baseline to 1.32 mu/ml by the completion of the trial. Significant decreases were first observed 4 weeks after the patients were placed on SSHI therapy. After transfer to SSHI, 43.3% of the patients achieved some improvement in glycemic control and only 16.4% were worse than at baseline. A decrease in weekly hypoglycemic reactions occurred during the course of the SSHI therapy. It appears that SSHI provides safe and effective treatment for insulin-dependent diabetic patients and that its use results in a rapid and significant decrease in insulin antibody formation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)123-128
Number of pages6
JournalDiabetes Research
Volume6
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1987

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Immunoglobulin G
Insulin
Antibodies
Insulin Antibodies
Glycosylated Hemoglobin A
Blood Glucose
Fasting
Insulins
Therapeutics
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Hypoglycemic Agents
Multicenter Studies
Antibody Formation
Clinical Trials
Safety

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Raskin, P., Etzwiler, D. D., Davidson, J. K., Nolte, M., Stephens, J. W., MacGillivray, M., & Lauritano, A. A. (1987). Rapid decrease of insulin specific IgG antibody levels in insulin-dependent patients transferred to semi-synthetic human insulin. Diabetes Research, 6(3), 123-128.

Rapid decrease of insulin specific IgG antibody levels in insulin-dependent patients transferred to semi-synthetic human insulin. / Raskin, Philip; Etzwiler, D. D.; Davidson, J. K.; Nolte, M.; Stephens, J. W.; MacGillivray, M.; Lauritano, A. A.

In: Diabetes Research, Vol. 6, No. 3, 1987, p. 123-128.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Raskin, P, Etzwiler, DD, Davidson, JK, Nolte, M, Stephens, JW, MacGillivray, M & Lauritano, AA 1987, 'Rapid decrease of insulin specific IgG antibody levels in insulin-dependent patients transferred to semi-synthetic human insulin', Diabetes Research, vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 123-128.
Raskin, Philip ; Etzwiler, D. D. ; Davidson, J. K. ; Nolte, M. ; Stephens, J. W. ; MacGillivray, M. ; Lauritano, A. A. / Rapid decrease of insulin specific IgG antibody levels in insulin-dependent patients transferred to semi-synthetic human insulin. In: Diabetes Research. 1987 ; Vol. 6, No. 3. pp. 123-128.
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