Rationale for the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the treatment of paediatric desmoid-type fibromatosis

Monika Sparber-Sauer, Daniel Orbach, Fariba Navid, Simone Hettmer, Stephen Skapek, Nadège Corradini, Michela Casanova, Aaron Weiss, Matthias Schwab, Andrea Ferrari

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

In children with desmoid-type fibromatosis (DTF) in whom disease progression occurs after an initial watch-and-wait strategy, prolonged low-dose chemotherapy using vinblastine and methotrexate (VBL-MTX) is currently the standard of care. These conventional drugs have been prospectively evaluated but their efficacy and safety profiles are limited, and alternative therapeutic options are therefore essential. Based on the results of clinical trials, the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in the treatment of DTF is currently considered only in adult patients. TKIs such as imatinib show superior therapeutic efficacy to VBL-MTX and tolerable short-term side effects for the treatment of adult DFT, supporting the concept of the use of TKIs for the treatment of paediatric DFT. Moreover, new-generation TKIs, such as pazopanib and sorafenib, have shown improved therapeutic efficacy compared to imatinib in adult non-comparative studies. A tolerable safety profile of TKI therapy in children with disease entities other than DTF, such as leukaemia, has been reported. However, the efficacy and, in particular, the long-term safety of TKIs, including childhood-specific aspects such as growth and fertility, for the treatment of children with DTF should be investigated prospectively, as DFT therapy requires long-term drug exposure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1637-1646
Number of pages10
JournalBritish journal of cancer
Volume124
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - May 11 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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