Receptor subtypes in opioid and stimulant reward

D. W. Self, L. Stein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Studies of the behaviourally-reinforcing actions of opioid and stimulant drugs of abuse are reviewed in an attempt to identify their reward-related brain receptors. We focus on data generated by drug self-administration, brain stimulation reinforcement, and conditioned place preference paradigms. A consistent body of evidence supports a role of μ and δ, but not for κ, receptors in opioid reward. Stimulant reward apparently involves both D1 and D2 receptors; the data favour D2 mediation of stimulant drug reinforcement with a permissive or modulatory role for D1 receptors. The reward-relevant opioid and dopamine receptors, as well as the cannabinoid (marijuana) receptor, share the ability to couple G(i) proteins that mediate inhibition of adenylate cyclase and stimulation of K+ conductance. These signal transduction mechanisms thus may be generally implicated in the reinforcing properties of diverse drugs of abuse.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)87-94
Number of pages8
JournalPharmacology and Toxicology
Volume70
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1992

Fingerprint

Street Drugs
Reward
Opioid Analgesics
Brain
Reinforcement
Signal transduction
Cannabinoids
Dopamine Receptors
Opioid Receptors
Cannabis
Adenylyl Cyclases
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Cannabinoid Receptors
Aptitude
Self Administration
Signal Transduction
Proteins
Reinforcement (Psychology)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Toxicology
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Receptor subtypes in opioid and stimulant reward. / Self, D. W.; Stein, L.

In: Pharmacology and Toxicology, Vol. 70, No. 2, 1992, p. 87-94.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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