Reduced Biaxial Contractility in the Descending Thoracic Aorta of Fibulin-5 Deficient Mice

S. I. Murtada, J. Ferruzzi, H. Yanagisawa, J. D. Humphrey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

The precise role of smooth muscle cell contractility in elastic arteries remains unclear, but accumulating evidence suggests that smooth muscle dysfunction plays an important role in the development of thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAADs). Given the increasing availability of mouse models of these conditions, there is a special opportunity to study roles of contractility ex vivo in intact vessels subjected to different mechanical loads. In parallel, of course, there is a similar need to study smooth muscle contractility in models that do not predispose to TAADs, particularly in cases where disease might be expected. Multiple mouse models having compromised glycoproteins that normally associate with elastin to form medial elastic fibers present with TAADs, yet those with fibulin-5 deficiency do not. In this paper, we show that deletion of the fibulin-5 gene results in a significantly diminished contractility of the thoracic aorta in response to potassium loading despite otherwise preserved characteristic active behaviors, including axial force generation and rates of contraction and relaxation. Interestingly, this diminished response manifests around an altered passive state that is defined primarily by a reduced in vivo axial stretch. Given this significant coupling between passive and active properties, a lack of significant changes in passive material stiffness may help to offset the diminished contractility and thereby protect the wall from detrimental mechanosensing and its sequelae.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number051008
JournalJournal of Biomechanical Engineering
Volume138
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2016

Keywords

  • active stress
  • artery
  • passive stress
  • smooth muscle
  • Wall mechanics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Physiology (medical)

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