Reduced REM latency predicts response to tricyclic medication in depressed outpatients

A. John Rush, Donna E. Giles, Robin B. Jarrett, Frida Feldman-Koffler, John R. Debus, Jan Weissenburger, Paul J. Orsulak, Howard P. Roffwarg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Forty-two outpatients with major depressive disorder entered a double-blind, randomized trial of either desipramine or amitriptyline for a minimum of 6 weeks. Pretreatment polysomnographic and clinical measures were used to predict response. Response was defined as a 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression score ≤9 at the end of treatment. There was a 61.1% response rate for patients treated with amitriptyline and a 66.7% response rate for patients treated with desipramine. Reduced REM latency (2-night mean ≤65.0 min) predicted a positive response to these tricyclic antidepressants. REM latency did not differentiate between desipramine or amitriptyline responders. More patients with reduced REM latency (80%) responded to treatment compared with patients with nonreduced REM latency (50%). The 80% response rate in reduced REM latency depressed patients confirms our previous findings in a mixed inpatient and outpatient sample. Contrary to our hypothesis, in this sample, endogenous depression was not associated with a good response to tricyclic medication.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)61-72
Number of pages12
JournalBiological Psychiatry
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1989

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Reaction Time
Outpatients
Desipramine
Amitriptyline
Tricyclic Antidepressive Agents
Major Depressive Disorder
Depressive Disorder
Inpatients
Depression
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biological Psychiatry

Cite this

Rush, A. J., Giles, D. E., Jarrett, R. B., Feldman-Koffler, F., Debus, J. R., Weissenburger, J., ... Roffwarg, H. P. (1989). Reduced REM latency predicts response to tricyclic medication in depressed outpatients. Biological Psychiatry, 26(1), 61-72. https://doi.org/10.1016/0006-3223(89)90008-5

Reduced REM latency predicts response to tricyclic medication in depressed outpatients. / Rush, A. John; Giles, Donna E.; Jarrett, Robin B.; Feldman-Koffler, Frida; Debus, John R.; Weissenburger, Jan; Orsulak, Paul J.; Roffwarg, Howard P.

In: Biological Psychiatry, Vol. 26, No. 1, 1989, p. 61-72.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rush, AJ, Giles, DE, Jarrett, RB, Feldman-Koffler, F, Debus, JR, Weissenburger, J, Orsulak, PJ & Roffwarg, HP 1989, 'Reduced REM latency predicts response to tricyclic medication in depressed outpatients', Biological Psychiatry, vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 61-72. https://doi.org/10.1016/0006-3223(89)90008-5
Rush, A. John ; Giles, Donna E. ; Jarrett, Robin B. ; Feldman-Koffler, Frida ; Debus, John R. ; Weissenburger, Jan ; Orsulak, Paul J. ; Roffwarg, Howard P. / Reduced REM latency predicts response to tricyclic medication in depressed outpatients. In: Biological Psychiatry. 1989 ; Vol. 26, No. 1. pp. 61-72.
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