Reducing Relapse and Recurrence in Unipolar Depression: A Comparative Meta-Analysis of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy's Effects

Jeffrey R. Vittengl, Lee Anna Clark, Todd W. Dunn, Robin B. Jarrett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

285 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Relapse and recurrence following response to acute-phase treatment for major depressive disorder (MDD) are prevalent and costly. In a meta-analysis of 28 studies including 1,880 adults, the authors reviewed the world's published literature on cognitive-behavioral therapies (CT) aimed at preventing relapse-recurrence in MDD. Results indicate that after discontinuation of acute-phase treatment, many responders to CT relapse-recur (29% within 1 year and 54% within 2 years). These rates appear comparable to those associated with other depression-specific psychotherapies but lower than those associated with pharmacotherapy. Among acute-phase treatment responders, continuation-phase CT reduced relapse-recurrence compared with assessment only at the end of continuation treatment (21% reduction) and at follow-up (29% reduction). Continuation-phase CT also reduced relapse-recurrence compared with other active continuation treatments at the end of continuation treatment (12% reduction) and at follow-up (14% reduction). The authors discuss implications for research and patient care and suggest directions, with methodological refinements, for future studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)475-488
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Volume75
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2007

Fingerprint

Cognitive Therapy
Depressive Disorder
Meta-Analysis
Recurrence
Major Depressive Disorder
Therapeutics
Acute-Phase Reaction
Psychotherapy
Patient Care
Depression
Drug Therapy
Research

Keywords

  • cognitive-behavioral therapy
  • continuation and maintenance treatment
  • depression
  • meta-analysis
  • relapse and recurrence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Reducing Relapse and Recurrence in Unipolar Depression : A Comparative Meta-Analysis of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy's Effects. / Vittengl, Jeffrey R.; Clark, Lee Anna; Dunn, Todd W.; Jarrett, Robin B.

In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol. 75, No. 3, 06.2007, p. 475-488.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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