Reduction of adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate instead of 3'-phosphoadenosine- 5'-phosphosulfate in cysteine biosynthesis by Rhizobium meliloti and other members of the family Rhizobiaceae

A. Pia Abola, Michael G. Willits, Richard C. Wang, Sharon R. Long

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

38 Scopus citations

Abstract

We have cloned and sequenced three genes from Rhizobium meliloti (Sinorhizobium meliloti) that are involved in sulfate activation for cysteine biosynthesis. Two of the genes display homology to the Escherichia coli cysDN genes, which code for an ATP sulfurylase (EC 2.7.7.4). The third gene has homology to the E. coli cysH gene, a 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) reductase (EC 1.8.99.4), but has greater homology to a set of genes found in Arabidopsis thaliana that encode an adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate (APS) reductase. In order to determine the specificity of the R. meliloti reductase, the R. meliloti cysH homolog was histidine tagged and purified, and its specificity was assayed in vitro. Like the A. thaliana reductases, the histidine-tagged R. meliloti cysH gene product appears to favor APS over PAPS as a substrate, with a K(m) for APS of 3 to 4 μM but a K(m) for PAPS of > 100 μM. In order to determine whether this preference for APS is unique to R. meliloti among members of the family Rhizobiaceae or is more widespread, cell extracts from R. leguminosarum, Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234, Rhizobium fredii (Sinorhizobium fredii), and Agrobacterium tumefaciens were assayed for APS or PAPS reductase activity. Cell extracts from all four species also preferentially reduce APS over PAPS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5280-5287
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of bacteriology
Volume181
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Molecular Biology

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