Refractures after forearm plate removal.

K. Rumball, M. Finnegan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Debate continues over the need for removal of internal fixation devices. Nowhere has this been more intense than in the area of forearm fractures. Although basic biologic principles would dictate that fixation interferes with bone physiology, clinical experience has taught surgeons that every reoperation has potential complications. We therefore retrospectively reviewed all patients undergoing forearm plate removal during a 5 1/2-year period. There were four subsequent refractures in 63 patients, for an incidence of 6%. Factors that appeared to influence the refracture rate were degree of initial displacement and comminution, physical characteristics of the plate, early removal, and lack of postremoval protection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)124-129
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Orthopaedic Trauma
Volume4
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1990

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Forearm
Internal Fixators
Reoperation
Bone and Bones
Incidence
Surgeons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Refractures after forearm plate removal. / Rumball, K.; Finnegan, M.

In: Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma, Vol. 4, No. 2, 1990, p. 124-129.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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