Regional cerebral blood flow in developmental stutterers

K. D. Pool, M. D. Devous, F. J. Freeman, B. C. Watson, T. Finitzo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Stuttering is a poorly understood communication disorder with a 1% global prevalence. Recently, there has been a resurgence of interest in a neurogenic origin for the disorder, although no research has established clear neurological differences between ''developmental'' (stuttering onset in childhood) stutterers and nonstutterers. We have used xenon 133 single-photon emission computed tomography to study regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in 20 stutterers. Analysis revealed global, absolute flow reductions. Relative flow asymmetries (left < right) were identified in three hemispheric regions: anterior cingulate and superior and middle temporal gyri. Milder changes were found in the left inferior frontal gyrus. Stutters had rCBF values below median for either anterior cingulate or middle temporal gyri. With one exception, severe stutterers had rCBF values below median for the anterior cingulate gyrus. All stutterers with rCBF values above median in the cingulate gyrus had rCBF values below median in the middle temporal gyrus, and severity of their disorder was either mild or moderate. Our findings suggest that stuttering is a neurogenic disorder involving recognized cortical regions of speech-motor control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)509-512
Number of pages4
JournalArchives of Neurology
Volume48
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1991

Fingerprint

Cerebrovascular Circulation
Regional Blood Flow
Gyrus Cinguli
Stuttering
Temporal Lobe
Communication Disorders
Xenon
Prefrontal Cortex
Single-Photon Emission-Computed Tomography
Stutterers
Regional Cerebral Blood Flow
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Pool, K. D., Devous, M. D., Freeman, F. J., Watson, B. C., & Finitzo, T. (1991). Regional cerebral blood flow in developmental stutterers. Archives of Neurology, 48(5), 509-512.

Regional cerebral blood flow in developmental stutterers. / Pool, K. D.; Devous, M. D.; Freeman, F. J.; Watson, B. C.; Finitzo, T.

In: Archives of Neurology, Vol. 48, No. 5, 1991, p. 509-512.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pool, KD, Devous, MD, Freeman, FJ, Watson, BC & Finitzo, T 1991, 'Regional cerebral blood flow in developmental stutterers', Archives of Neurology, vol. 48, no. 5, pp. 509-512.
Pool KD, Devous MD, Freeman FJ, Watson BC, Finitzo T. Regional cerebral blood flow in developmental stutterers. Archives of Neurology. 1991;48(5):509-512.
Pool, K. D. ; Devous, M. D. ; Freeman, F. J. ; Watson, B. C. ; Finitzo, T. / Regional cerebral blood flow in developmental stutterers. In: Archives of Neurology. 1991 ; Vol. 48, No. 5. pp. 509-512.
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