Regulator of G protein signaling is a crucial modulator of antidepressant drug action in depression and neuropathic pain models

Maria Stratinaki, Artemis Varidaki, Vasiliki Mitsi, Subroto Ghose, Jane Magida, Caroline Dias, Scott J. Russo, Vincent Vialou, Barbara J. Caldarone, Carol A. Tamminga, Eric J. Nestler, Venetia Zachariou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Regulator of G protein signaling 4 (Rgs4) is a signal transduction protein that controls the function ofmonoamine, opiate,muscarinic, and other G protein-coupled receptors via interactions with Ga subunits. Rgs4 is expressed in several brain regions involved in mood, movement, cognition, and addiction and is regulated by psychotropic drugs, stress, and corticosteroids. In this study, we use genetic mouse models and viral-mediated gene transfer to examine the role of Rgs4 in the actions of antidepressant medications. We first analyzed human postmortem brain tissue and found robust up-regulation of RGS4 expression in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of subjects receiving standard antidepressant medications that target monoamine systems. Behavioral studies of mice lacking Rgs4, including specific knockdowns in NAc, demonstrate that Rgs4 in this brain region acts as a positive modulator of the antidepressant-like and antiallodynic-like actions of several monoamine-directed antidepressant drugs, including tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors. Studies using viral-mediated increases in Rgs4 activity inNAc further support this hypothesis. Interestingly, in prefrontal cortex, Rgs4 acts as a negative modulator of the actions of nonmonoamine-directed drugs that are purported to act as antidepressants: the N-methyl-Daspartate glutamate receptor antagonist ketamine and the delta opioid agonist (+)-4-[(aR)-a-((2S,5R)-4-Allyl-2,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)- 3-methoxybenzyl]-N,N-diethylbenzamide. Together, these data reveal a unique modulatory role of Rgs4 in the brain region-specific actions of a wide range of antidepressant drugs and indicate that pharmacological interventions at the level of RGS4 activity may enhance the actions of such drugs used for the treatment of depression and neuropathic pain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)8254-8259
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume110
Issue number20
DOIs
StatePublished - May 14 2013

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GTP-Binding Protein Regulators
Neuralgia
Antidepressive Agents
Depression
Tricyclic Antidepressive Agents
Nucleus Accumbens
Brain
Opiate Alkaloids
Excitatory Amino Acid Antagonists
Viral Genes
Genetic Models
Psychotropic Drugs
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors
Ketamine
G-Protein-Coupled Receptors
Prefrontal Cortex
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Cognition
Cholinergic Agents
Opioid Analgesics

Keywords

  • Adeno-associated viruses
  • Conditional knockout mice
  • Desipramine
  • Mood disorders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Regulator of G protein signaling is a crucial modulator of antidepressant drug action in depression and neuropathic pain models. / Stratinaki, Maria; Varidaki, Artemis; Mitsi, Vasiliki; Ghose, Subroto; Magida, Jane; Dias, Caroline; Russo, Scott J.; Vialou, Vincent; Caldarone, Barbara J.; Tamminga, Carol A.; Nestler, Eric J.; Zachariou, Venetia.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 110, No. 20, 14.05.2013, p. 8254-8259.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stratinaki, Maria ; Varidaki, Artemis ; Mitsi, Vasiliki ; Ghose, Subroto ; Magida, Jane ; Dias, Caroline ; Russo, Scott J. ; Vialou, Vincent ; Caldarone, Barbara J. ; Tamminga, Carol A. ; Nestler, Eric J. ; Zachariou, Venetia. / Regulator of G protein signaling is a crucial modulator of antidepressant drug action in depression and neuropathic pain models. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2013 ; Vol. 110, No. 20. pp. 8254-8259.
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