Reintervention rates after bioprosthetic pulmonary valve replacement in patients younger than 30 years of age: A multicenter analysis

Christopher W. Baird, Mariana Chávez, Lynn A. Sleeper, Michele J. Borisuk, Emile A. Bacha, Luke Burchill, Kristine Guleserian, Michel Ilbawi, Khanh Nguyen, Anees Razzouk, Takeshi Shinkawa, Minmin Lu, Stephanie M. Fuller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: To assess the difference in time to and predictors of reintervention according to valve type in surgical bioprosthetic pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) in patients younger than 30 years of age from multiple centers. Methods: Data were retrospectively collected for 1278 patients <30 years of age undergoing PVR at 8 centers between 1996 and 2015. Results: Mean age at PVR was 19.3 ± 12.8 years, with 719 (56.3%) patients ≤18 years of age. Diagnosis was tetralogy of Fallot in 626 patients (50.5%) and 165 (12.9%) had previous PVR. Median follow-up was 3.9 years (interquartile range, 1.2, 6.4). Multiple valve types were used, most commonly CE PERIMOUNT, 488 (38.2%), CE Magna/Magna Ease, 361 (28.2%), and Sorin Mitroflow 322 (25.2). Reintervention occurred in 12.7% and was most commonly due to pulmonary stenosis (68.8%), with most reinterventions occurring in children (85.2%) and with smaller valve sizes (P <.001) Among adults aged 18 to 30 years, younger age was not a significant risk factor for reintervention. Surgical indication of isolated pulmonary regurgitation was associated with a lower risk of reintervention (P <.001). Overall, 1-, 3-, 5-, and 10-year freedom from reintervention rates were 99%, 97%, 92%, and 65%. The only independent risk factors for reintervention after controlling for age and valve size were lack of a concomitant tricuspid valve procedure (P =.02) and valve type (P <.001); Sorin and St Jude valves were associated with similar time to reintervention, and deteriorated more rapidly than other valve types. Conclusions: In this large multicenter study, 8% of patients have undergone reintervention by 5 years. Importantly, independent of age and valve size, reintervention rates vary by valve type.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)345-362.e2
JournalJournal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume161
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • bioprosthesis
  • congenital
  • heart defects
  • pediatric
  • pulmonary regurgitation
  • pulmonary stenosis
  • pulmonary valve
  • reoperation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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