Relationship between Excessive Gestational Weight Gain and Neonatal Adiposity in Women with Mild Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units (MFMU) Network

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relationships among excessive gestational weight gain, neonatal adiposity, and adverse obstetric outcomes in women with mild gestational diabetes mellitus. METHODS: This is a secondary analysis of a multicenter randomized clinical trial of women with mild gestational diabetes mellitus. Based on self-reported prepregnancy body weight, gestational weight gain was categorized as excessive if it was greater than 2009 Institute of Medicine guidelines. Maternal outcomes and neonatal anthropomorphic characteristics were compared between women with excessive weight gain and those without excessive weight gain. Multiple linear and logistic regression analyses were performed to adjust for confounding factors. RESULTS: We studied 841 women who participated in the main trial and had prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) and delivery information available (n431 treatment group, n410 no treatment). After adjustment for factors including treatment and prepregnancy BMI, excessive weight gain remained associated with large for gestational age (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 2.94, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.81-4.93), birth weight greater than 4,000 g (adjusted OR 2.56, 95% CI 1.54-4.40), preeclampsia (adjusted OR 2.96, 95% CI 1.35-7.03), and cesarean delivery for labor arrest (adjusted OR 2.37, 95% CI 1.30-4.44). In addition, excessive weight gain was independently associated with increased total neonatal fat (P<.001) and birth weight (P<.001). CONCLUSION: In women with both treated and untreated mild gestational diabetes mellitus, excessive gestational weight gain was independently associated with both greater birth weight and adiposity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1325-1332
Number of pages8
JournalObstetrics and Gynecology
Volume128
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

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Gestational Diabetes
Adiposity
Weight Gain
Odds Ratio
Birth Weight
Confidence Intervals
Body Mass Index
National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine (U.S.) Health and Medicine Division
Pre-Eclampsia
Gestational Age
Obstetrics
Linear Models
Therapeutics
Randomized Controlled Trials
Logistic Models
Fats
Body Weight
Regression Analysis
Mothers
Guidelines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units (MFMU) Network (2016). Relationship between Excessive Gestational Weight Gain and Neonatal Adiposity in Women with Mild Gestational Diabetes Mellitus. Obstetrics and Gynecology, 128(6), 1325-1332. https://doi.org/10.1097/AOG.0000000000001773

Relationship between Excessive Gestational Weight Gain and Neonatal Adiposity in Women with Mild Gestational Diabetes Mellitus. / Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units (MFMU) Network.

In: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 128, No. 6, 01.12.2016, p. 1325-1332.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units (MFMU) Network 2016, 'Relationship between Excessive Gestational Weight Gain and Neonatal Adiposity in Women with Mild Gestational Diabetes Mellitus', Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 128, no. 6, pp. 1325-1332. https://doi.org/10.1097/AOG.0000000000001773
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units (MFMU) Network. Relationship between Excessive Gestational Weight Gain and Neonatal Adiposity in Women with Mild Gestational Diabetes Mellitus. Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2016 Dec 1;128(6):1325-1332. https://doi.org/10.1097/AOG.0000000000001773
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units (MFMU) Network. / Relationship between Excessive Gestational Weight Gain and Neonatal Adiposity in Women with Mild Gestational Diabetes Mellitus. In: Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2016 ; Vol. 128, No. 6. pp. 1325-1332.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relationships among excessive gestational weight gain, neonatal adiposity, and adverse obstetric outcomes in women with mild gestational diabetes mellitus. METHODS: This is a secondary analysis of a multicenter randomized clinical trial of women with mild gestational diabetes mellitus. Based on self-reported prepregnancy body weight, gestational weight gain was categorized as excessive if it was greater than 2009 Institute of Medicine guidelines. Maternal outcomes and neonatal anthropomorphic characteristics were compared between women with excessive weight gain and those without excessive weight gain. Multiple linear and logistic regression analyses were performed to adjust for confounding factors. RESULTS: We studied 841 women who participated in the main trial and had prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) and delivery information available (n431 treatment group, n410 no treatment). After adjustment for factors including treatment and prepregnancy BMI, excessive weight gain remained associated with large for gestational age (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 2.94, 95{\%} confidence interval [CI] 1.81-4.93), birth weight greater than 4,000 g (adjusted OR 2.56, 95{\%} CI 1.54-4.40), preeclampsia (adjusted OR 2.96, 95{\%} CI 1.35-7.03), and cesarean delivery for labor arrest (adjusted OR 2.37, 95{\%} CI 1.30-4.44). In addition, excessive weight gain was independently associated with increased total neonatal fat (P<.001) and birth weight (P<.001). CONCLUSION: In women with both treated and untreated mild gestational diabetes mellitus, excessive gestational weight gain was independently associated with both greater birth weight and adiposity.",
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AU - Landon, Mark B.

AU - Mele, Lisa

AU - Reddy, Uma M.

AU - Casey, Brian M.

AU - Wapner, Ronald J.

AU - Varner, Michael W.

AU - Rouse, Dwight J.

AU - Thorp, John M.

AU - Sciscione, Anthony

AU - Catalano, Patrick

AU - Saade, George

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N2 - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relationships among excessive gestational weight gain, neonatal adiposity, and adverse obstetric outcomes in women with mild gestational diabetes mellitus. METHODS: This is a secondary analysis of a multicenter randomized clinical trial of women with mild gestational diabetes mellitus. Based on self-reported prepregnancy body weight, gestational weight gain was categorized as excessive if it was greater than 2009 Institute of Medicine guidelines. Maternal outcomes and neonatal anthropomorphic characteristics were compared between women with excessive weight gain and those without excessive weight gain. Multiple linear and logistic regression analyses were performed to adjust for confounding factors. RESULTS: We studied 841 women who participated in the main trial and had prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) and delivery information available (n431 treatment group, n410 no treatment). After adjustment for factors including treatment and prepregnancy BMI, excessive weight gain remained associated with large for gestational age (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 2.94, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.81-4.93), birth weight greater than 4,000 g (adjusted OR 2.56, 95% CI 1.54-4.40), preeclampsia (adjusted OR 2.96, 95% CI 1.35-7.03), and cesarean delivery for labor arrest (adjusted OR 2.37, 95% CI 1.30-4.44). In addition, excessive weight gain was independently associated with increased total neonatal fat (P<.001) and birth weight (P<.001). CONCLUSION: In women with both treated and untreated mild gestational diabetes mellitus, excessive gestational weight gain was independently associated with both greater birth weight and adiposity.

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