Relationship of hepatic fibrosis, cirrhosis, and mortality with cholecystectomy in patients with hepatitis C virus infection

Donald J. Martin, Rick Weideman, Terri Crook, Geri Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives Studies have suggested that cholecystectomy is a risk factor for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, but it is not known whether cholecystectomy is a risk factor for the progression of other chronic liver diseases such as hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The aim of this study was to assess whether cholecystectomy is associated with an increase in fibrosis, cirrhosis, and cirrhosis-related complications in patients with chronic HCV infection. Methods Among a total of 3989 HCV-positive patients at the VA North Texas Health Care System, we retrospectively reviewed the records of 88 patients who had undergone cholecystectomy between 1998 and 2013, followed up for a median of 4.9 years. We compared the outcomes of these patients with those of two age-matched, race-matched, and sex-matched cohorts: a cohort consisting of 129 HCV-positive patients without gallbladder disease (GBD) and a second cohort consisting of 178 HCVpositive patients with GBD who had not undergone cholecystectomy. Demographics, presence of metabolic syndrome, alcohol use, laboratory data, and clinical progression of liver disease were compared at study entry and 5 years later. Results Controlling for multiple factors associated with increase in liver fibrosis, analyses confirmed that a there was an increase in the proportion of patients who developed cirrhosis [odds ratio (OR) =3.24, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.57'6.68, P=0.001] and ascites (OR =3.01, 95% CI 1.14'7.97, P= 0.026) as well as in the incidence of death (OR =6.29, 95% CI 2.13'18.59, P =0.001) 5 years after cohort entry among HCV-positive patients with cholecystectomy compared with HCV-positive controls. The HCV-positive patient group with previous cholecystectomy showed an increased incidence of cirrhosis (OR =2.43, 95% CI 1.34'4.41, P =0.004), hepatocellular carcinoma (OR= 2.85, 95% CI 1.11'7.36, P= 0.030), and death (OR= 3.31, 95% CI 1.50'7.28, P =0.003) 5 years after cohort entry compared with HCV-positive controls with GBD who had not undergone cholecystectomy. Conclusion Cholecystectomy among HCV-positive patients is associated an increased incidence of fibrosis, cirrhosis, and its complications (ascites, hepatocellular carcinoma, and death) compared with HCV-positive controls and HCV-positive patients with GBD who have not undergone cholecystectomy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)181-186
Number of pages6
JournalEuropean Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

Keywords

  • Cholecystectomy
  • Cirrhosis
  • Hepatitis C

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology
  • Hepatology

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