Relative contributions of occlusion, maximum bite force, and chewing cycle kinematics to masticatory performance

Casey R. Lepley, Gaylord S. Throckmorton, Richard F. Ceen, Peter H. Buschang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: The purpose of this study was to explore the contributions of occlusion, maximum bite force, and chewing cycle kinematics to masticatory performance. Methods: A prospective cross-sectional study was performed on 30 subjects with Class I occlusion. Masticatory performance was measured with the test food Cuttersil (Heraeus Kulzer, South Bend, Ind) and the fractional-sieve technique. Blu-Mousse (Parkell Biomaterials, Farmingdale, NY) bite registrations were used to measure occlusal contact areas. The American Board of Orthodontics occlusal discrepancies were measured on the subjects' dental models. Maximum bite forces were recorded with a custom transducer, and 3-dimensional chewing cycle kinematics were tracked with an opto-electric computer system and Optotrak software (Northern Digital, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada). Results: Masticatory performance was most closely correlated with occlusal contact area, indicating larger contact areas in subjects with better performance. Occlusal contact area and occlusal discrepancies were also related to bite force and chewing cycle kinematics. Maximum bite force was positively related with masticatory performance. Conclusions: Although masticatory performance is related, both directly and indirectly, to a number of morphologic and functional factors, it is most closely related to occlusal factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)606-613
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
Volume139
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2011

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Bite Force
Mastication
Biomechanical Phenomena
Jaw Relation Record
Dental Models
Computer Systems
Biocompatible Materials
Ontario
Orthodontics
Transducers
Canada
Software
Cross-Sectional Studies
Food

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthodontics

Cite this

Relative contributions of occlusion, maximum bite force, and chewing cycle kinematics to masticatory performance. / Lepley, Casey R.; Throckmorton, Gaylord S.; Ceen, Richard F.; Buschang, Peter H.

In: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Vol. 139, No. 5, 05.2011, p. 606-613.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lepley, Casey R. ; Throckmorton, Gaylord S. ; Ceen, Richard F. ; Buschang, Peter H. / Relative contributions of occlusion, maximum bite force, and chewing cycle kinematics to masticatory performance. In: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics. 2011 ; Vol. 139, No. 5. pp. 606-613.
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