Reliability of capnography in identifying esophageal intubation with carbonated beverage or antacid in the stomach

S. T. Sum Ping, M. P. Mehta, T. Symreng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To evaluate the reliability of capnography in identifying esophageal intubation in the presence of a carbonated beverage in the stomach, we first investigated the amount of CO2 released from different carbonated beverages and antacids in a simulated stomach; next we measured the end-expired CO2 level during esophageal ventilation with a carbonated beverage in the stomachs of six swine. CO2 levels of approximately 20% were consistently observed in all carbonated beverages. The CO2 levels obtained with sodium bicarbonate, Maalox, and sodium citrate were 19.3%, 2.0%, and 0%, respectively. CO2 waveforms were observed during esophageal ventilation in five of six animals after intragastric administration of a carbonated beverage. An end-expired CO2 level of 2.5% or more was observed in two swine. The highest end-expired CO2, level measured was 5.3%. We conclude that although capnography is convenient and effective, it lacks all the attributes of an ideal monitor for detecting esophageal intubation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)333-337
Number of pages5
JournalAnesthesia and Analgesia
Volume73
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1991

Fingerprint

Capnography
Carbonated Beverages
Antacids
Intubation
Stomach
Ventilation
Swine
Sodium Bicarbonate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Reliability of capnography in identifying esophageal intubation with carbonated beverage or antacid in the stomach. / Sum Ping, S. T.; Mehta, M. P.; Symreng, T.

In: Anesthesia and Analgesia, Vol. 73, No. 3, 1991, p. 333-337.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{d84e4600d0da4a64b3b4261267325e1a,
title = "Reliability of capnography in identifying esophageal intubation with carbonated beverage or antacid in the stomach",
abstract = "To evaluate the reliability of capnography in identifying esophageal intubation in the presence of a carbonated beverage in the stomach, we first investigated the amount of CO2 released from different carbonated beverages and antacids in a simulated stomach; next we measured the end-expired CO2 level during esophageal ventilation with a carbonated beverage in the stomachs of six swine. CO2 levels of approximately 20{\%} were consistently observed in all carbonated beverages. The CO2 levels obtained with sodium bicarbonate, Maalox, and sodium citrate were 19.3{\%}, 2.0{\%}, and 0{\%}, respectively. CO2 waveforms were observed during esophageal ventilation in five of six animals after intragastric administration of a carbonated beverage. An end-expired CO2 level of 2.5{\%} or more was observed in two swine. The highest end-expired CO2, level measured was 5.3{\%}. We conclude that although capnography is convenient and effective, it lacks all the attributes of an ideal monitor for detecting esophageal intubation.",
author = "{Sum Ping}, {S. T.} and Mehta, {M. P.} and T. Symreng",
year = "1991",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "73",
pages = "333--337",
journal = "Anesthesia and Analgesia",
issn = "0003-2999",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Reliability of capnography in identifying esophageal intubation with carbonated beverage or antacid in the stomach

AU - Sum Ping, S. T.

AU - Mehta, M. P.

AU - Symreng, T.

PY - 1991

Y1 - 1991

N2 - To evaluate the reliability of capnography in identifying esophageal intubation in the presence of a carbonated beverage in the stomach, we first investigated the amount of CO2 released from different carbonated beverages and antacids in a simulated stomach; next we measured the end-expired CO2 level during esophageal ventilation with a carbonated beverage in the stomachs of six swine. CO2 levels of approximately 20% were consistently observed in all carbonated beverages. The CO2 levels obtained with sodium bicarbonate, Maalox, and sodium citrate were 19.3%, 2.0%, and 0%, respectively. CO2 waveforms were observed during esophageal ventilation in five of six animals after intragastric administration of a carbonated beverage. An end-expired CO2 level of 2.5% or more was observed in two swine. The highest end-expired CO2, level measured was 5.3%. We conclude that although capnography is convenient and effective, it lacks all the attributes of an ideal monitor for detecting esophageal intubation.

AB - To evaluate the reliability of capnography in identifying esophageal intubation in the presence of a carbonated beverage in the stomach, we first investigated the amount of CO2 released from different carbonated beverages and antacids in a simulated stomach; next we measured the end-expired CO2 level during esophageal ventilation with a carbonated beverage in the stomachs of six swine. CO2 levels of approximately 20% were consistently observed in all carbonated beverages. The CO2 levels obtained with sodium bicarbonate, Maalox, and sodium citrate were 19.3%, 2.0%, and 0%, respectively. CO2 waveforms were observed during esophageal ventilation in five of six animals after intragastric administration of a carbonated beverage. An end-expired CO2 level of 2.5% or more was observed in two swine. The highest end-expired CO2, level measured was 5.3%. We conclude that although capnography is convenient and effective, it lacks all the attributes of an ideal monitor for detecting esophageal intubation.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0025900979&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0025900979&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 1907817

AN - SCOPUS:0025900979

VL - 73

SP - 333

EP - 337

JO - Anesthesia and Analgesia

JF - Anesthesia and Analgesia

SN - 0003-2999

IS - 3

ER -