Reliability of self-reported childhood physical abuse by adults and factors predictive of inconsistent reporting

Christy M. McKinney, T. Robert Harris, Raul Caetano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

42 Scopus citations

Abstract

Little is known about the reliability of self-reported child physical abuse (CPA) or CPA reporting practices. We estimated reliability and prevalence of self-reported CPA and identified factors predictive of inconsistent CPA reporting among 2,256 participants using surveys administered in 1995 and 2000. Reliability of CPA was fair to moderate (κ = 0.41). Using a positive report from either survey, the prevalence of moderate (61.8%) and severe (12.0%) CPA was higher than at either survey alone. Compared to consistent reporters of having experienced CPA, inconsistent reporters were less likely to be ≥30 years old (vs. 18-29) or Black (vs. White) and more likely to have <12 years of education (vs. 12), have no alcohol-related problems (vs. having problems), or report one type (vs. ≥2) of CPA. These findings may assist researchers conducting and interpreting studies of CPA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)653-668
Number of pages16
JournalViolence and Victims
Volume24
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

Keywords

  • Child abuse
  • Health survey
  • Population based
  • Prevalence
  • Reporting practices

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Health(social science)
  • Law

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