Remission with venlafaxine extended release or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in depressed patients: A randomized, open-label study

Michael E. Thase, Philip T. Ninan, Jeff J. Musgnung, Madhukar H. Trivedi

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6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: This randomized, open-label, rater-blinded, multicenter study compared treatment outcomes with the serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) venlafaxine extended release (ER) with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in primary care patients with major depressive disorder. Method: Study data were collected from November 29, 2000, to March 4, 2003. Outpatients who met diagnostic criteria for major depressive disorder according to the Mental Health Screener, a computer-administered telephone interview program that screens for the most common mental disorders, and had a total score on the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS17) ≥ 20 were randomly assigned to receive up to 6 months of open-label venlafaxine ER 75-225 mg/d (n = 688) or an SSRI (n = 697): fluoxetine 20-80 mg/d, paroxetine 20-50 mg/d, citalopram 20-40 mg/d, and sertraline 50-200 mg/d. The primary outcome was remission (HDRS17 score ≤ 7) at study end point using the last-observation-carried-forward method to account for early termination. A mixed-effects model for repeated measures (MMRM) analysis evaluated secondary outcome measures. Results: Fifty-one percent of patients completed the study. Month 6 remission rates did not differ significantly for venlafaxine ER and the SSRIs (35.5% vs 32.0%, respectively; P =.195). The MMRM analysis of HDRS17 scores also did not differ significantly (P =.0538). Significant treatment effects favoring the venlafaxine ER group were observed for remission rates at days 30, 60, 90, and 135 and a survival analysis of time to remission (P =.006), as well as Clinical Global Impressions-severity of illness scale (P =.0002); Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety subscale (P =.03); 6-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Bech version (P =.009); and Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self-Report (P =.0003). Conclusions: Remission rates for patients treated with venlafaxine ER or an SSRI did not differ significantly after 6 months of treatment. Results of most secondary analyses suggested that SNRI treatment had a greater antidepressant effect versus the SSRIs studied.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPrimary Care Companion to the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011

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Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors
Major Depressive Disorder
Depression
Anxiety
Sertraline
Paroxetine
Citalopram
Fluoxetine
Survival Analysis
Mental Disorders
Self Report
Antidepressive Agents
Multicenter Studies
Primary Health Care
Mental Health
Outpatients
Therapeutics
Observation
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Venlafaxine Hydrochloride

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

@article{bc2899b97639462fa787f2be3d1944ea,
title = "Remission with venlafaxine extended release or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in depressed patients: A randomized, open-label study",
abstract = "Background: This randomized, open-label, rater-blinded, multicenter study compared treatment outcomes with the serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) venlafaxine extended release (ER) with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in primary care patients with major depressive disorder. Method: Study data were collected from November 29, 2000, to March 4, 2003. Outpatients who met diagnostic criteria for major depressive disorder according to the Mental Health Screener, a computer-administered telephone interview program that screens for the most common mental disorders, and had a total score on the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS17) ≥ 20 were randomly assigned to receive up to 6 months of open-label venlafaxine ER 75-225 mg/d (n = 688) or an SSRI (n = 697): fluoxetine 20-80 mg/d, paroxetine 20-50 mg/d, citalopram 20-40 mg/d, and sertraline 50-200 mg/d. The primary outcome was remission (HDRS17 score ≤ 7) at study end point using the last-observation-carried-forward method to account for early termination. A mixed-effects model for repeated measures (MMRM) analysis evaluated secondary outcome measures. Results: Fifty-one percent of patients completed the study. Month 6 remission rates did not differ significantly for venlafaxine ER and the SSRIs (35.5{\%} vs 32.0{\%}, respectively; P =.195). The MMRM analysis of HDRS17 scores also did not differ significantly (P =.0538). Significant treatment effects favoring the venlafaxine ER group were observed for remission rates at days 30, 60, 90, and 135 and a survival analysis of time to remission (P =.006), as well as Clinical Global Impressions-severity of illness scale (P =.0002); Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety subscale (P =.03); 6-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Bech version (P =.009); and Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self-Report (P =.0003). Conclusions: Remission rates for patients treated with venlafaxine ER or an SSRI did not differ significantly after 6 months of treatment. Results of most secondary analyses suggested that SNRI treatment had a greater antidepressant effect versus the SSRIs studied.",
author = "Thase, {Michael E.} and Ninan, {Philip T.} and Musgnung, {Jeff J.} and Trivedi, {Madhukar H.}",
year = "2011",
doi = "10.4088/PCC.10m00979blu",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "13",
journal = "The primary care companion for CNS disorders",
issn = "1523-5998",
publisher = "Physicians Postgraduate Press Inc.",
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T1 - Remission with venlafaxine extended release or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in depressed patients

T2 - A randomized, open-label study

AU - Thase, Michael E.

AU - Ninan, Philip T.

AU - Musgnung, Jeff J.

AU - Trivedi, Madhukar H.

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - Background: This randomized, open-label, rater-blinded, multicenter study compared treatment outcomes with the serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) venlafaxine extended release (ER) with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in primary care patients with major depressive disorder. Method: Study data were collected from November 29, 2000, to March 4, 2003. Outpatients who met diagnostic criteria for major depressive disorder according to the Mental Health Screener, a computer-administered telephone interview program that screens for the most common mental disorders, and had a total score on the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS17) ≥ 20 were randomly assigned to receive up to 6 months of open-label venlafaxine ER 75-225 mg/d (n = 688) or an SSRI (n = 697): fluoxetine 20-80 mg/d, paroxetine 20-50 mg/d, citalopram 20-40 mg/d, and sertraline 50-200 mg/d. The primary outcome was remission (HDRS17 score ≤ 7) at study end point using the last-observation-carried-forward method to account for early termination. A mixed-effects model for repeated measures (MMRM) analysis evaluated secondary outcome measures. Results: Fifty-one percent of patients completed the study. Month 6 remission rates did not differ significantly for venlafaxine ER and the SSRIs (35.5% vs 32.0%, respectively; P =.195). The MMRM analysis of HDRS17 scores also did not differ significantly (P =.0538). Significant treatment effects favoring the venlafaxine ER group were observed for remission rates at days 30, 60, 90, and 135 and a survival analysis of time to remission (P =.006), as well as Clinical Global Impressions-severity of illness scale (P =.0002); Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety subscale (P =.03); 6-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Bech version (P =.009); and Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self-Report (P =.0003). Conclusions: Remission rates for patients treated with venlafaxine ER or an SSRI did not differ significantly after 6 months of treatment. Results of most secondary analyses suggested that SNRI treatment had a greater antidepressant effect versus the SSRIs studied.

AB - Background: This randomized, open-label, rater-blinded, multicenter study compared treatment outcomes with the serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) venlafaxine extended release (ER) with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in primary care patients with major depressive disorder. Method: Study data were collected from November 29, 2000, to March 4, 2003. Outpatients who met diagnostic criteria for major depressive disorder according to the Mental Health Screener, a computer-administered telephone interview program that screens for the most common mental disorders, and had a total score on the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS17) ≥ 20 were randomly assigned to receive up to 6 months of open-label venlafaxine ER 75-225 mg/d (n = 688) or an SSRI (n = 697): fluoxetine 20-80 mg/d, paroxetine 20-50 mg/d, citalopram 20-40 mg/d, and sertraline 50-200 mg/d. The primary outcome was remission (HDRS17 score ≤ 7) at study end point using the last-observation-carried-forward method to account for early termination. A mixed-effects model for repeated measures (MMRM) analysis evaluated secondary outcome measures. Results: Fifty-one percent of patients completed the study. Month 6 remission rates did not differ significantly for venlafaxine ER and the SSRIs (35.5% vs 32.0%, respectively; P =.195). The MMRM analysis of HDRS17 scores also did not differ significantly (P =.0538). Significant treatment effects favoring the venlafaxine ER group were observed for remission rates at days 30, 60, 90, and 135 and a survival analysis of time to remission (P =.006), as well as Clinical Global Impressions-severity of illness scale (P =.0002); Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety subscale (P =.03); 6-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Bech version (P =.009); and Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self-Report (P =.0003). Conclusions: Remission rates for patients treated with venlafaxine ER or an SSRI did not differ significantly after 6 months of treatment. Results of most secondary analyses suggested that SNRI treatment had a greater antidepressant effect versus the SSRIs studied.

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